Literary journal SmokeLong Quarterly is inviting applications from new and emerging flash fiction writers for the 2018 Kathy Fish Fellowship.

Established in 2003, SmokeLong Quarterly aims to publish the best flash fiction to the web, whether written by widely published authors or those new to the craft. Flash fiction published by SmokeLong has been recognised by the Pushcart Prize, Best of the Web, Best Small Fictions and the Wigleaf Top 50.

The winner of the Kathy Fish Fellowship 2018 will act as a writer-in-residence, with their flash fiction appearing in every issue of the magazine next year. The successful writer will receive a total remuneration of US$500; $100 per story plus $100 when the fellowship is announced.

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The Arkansas International is inviting entries for its inaugural emerging writer’s prize. The winner will receive US$1000 and publication. The prize is only open to writers who have not yet published a full-length book.

The Arkansas International is a journal of literature from the University of Arkansas Program in Creative Writing and Translation. Its first issue was published in Fall 2016 with the aim of publishing the best fiction, poetry, essays, comics and works in translation from the United States and abroad.

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Kathy Fish Fellowship - SmokeLong Quarterly

Literary journal SmokeLong Quarterly is inviting applications from new and emerging flash fiction writers for the 2017 Kathy Fish Fellowship.

Established in 2003, SmokeLong Quarterly aims to publish the best flash fiction to the web, whether written by widely published authors or those new to the craft. Flash fiction published by SmokeLong has been recognised by the Pushcart Prize, Best of the Web, Best Small Fictions and the Wigleaf Top 50.

The winner of the Kathy Fish Fellowship 2017 will act as a writer-in-residence, with their flash fiction appearing in every issue of the magazine next year. The successful writer will receive a total remuneration of US$500; $100 per story plus $100 when the fellowship is announced.

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New Orleans Review is Accepting Work for a Special Shakespeare Issue

Literary magazine New Orleans Review is currently accepting work for a Shakespeare-inspired special issue. The issue will be published in 2016 to coincide with the 400th anniversary of the great writer’s death.

Submissions can “riff on, respond to, reimagine, or recast any of Shakespeare’s works”. The editors of New Orleans review are hoping to receive a wide variety of interpretations of the theme – from poetry to fiction, from radio plays to experimental texts.

Prose submissions can be up to 7500 words and poetry submissions should be no more than five pages. All work must be previously unpublished but simultaneous submissions are accepted. All contributors will receive two complimentary copies of the issue.

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No Poem Starts Perfect: A Q&A with Pelorus Press

Pelorus Press is a new literary magazine based in New York City. The magazine asks contributors to submit their work in a unique way. We got in touch with editor Cahaley Markman to find out more.

Why did you want to establish your own literary magazine?

I started this magazine with my friend and co-founding editor Dylan Debelis. We both really love poetry and wanted to play a role in getting more poetry out into the world; however, it was very important to both of us that this magazine bring something different to the table. There are already so many great literary journals out there, I wanted to make sure that if we were going to enter the publication world it would be because we were doing something different than a standard journal. I thought it would be interesting to bring the focus to the writing process.

What makes Pelorus Press unique?

Our focus on the writing process rather than the product sets us apart from most literary magazines. We do this by publishing several drafts of each poem along with the final draft. The reader gets to see where the poem started, and how it grew over time. It’s also really cool because some of the poems we published have hand written revisions and notes. It feels very intimate to read. As if you get a sneak peek into the poet’s thought process.

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