Literary magazine Oxford American is offering a nine-month fellowship to one talented writer. The selected fellow will receive a $10,000 living stipend, housing and an editorial apprenticeship with the Oxford American. The fellowship is intended to support the writing of a debut book of creative nonfiction.

Based in Little Rock, Arkansas, The Oxford American is a nonprofit, quarterly literary magazine dedicated to featuring “the best in Southern writing while documenting the complexity and vitality of the American South”. The journalism and literature published in the Oxford American has received numerous prizes, including The O. Henry Prize and The Pushcart Prize, and has been featured in The Best American Essays, The Best American Short Stories, The Best American Mystery Stories, and The Best American Travel Writing.

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The James Jones Fellowship Contest is now in its 26th year. It awards $10,000 to an American writer with a first fiction novel in progress in 2017. Two runners-up will each receive $1000.

Entrants are asked to supply a two-page outline of their entire novel, plus the first 50 pages of the work.

The fellowship is only for unpublished first novels: collections of short stories, memoirs and self-published novels are not eligible. To enter this contest, writers must be United States citizens.

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Entries are now open for the St. Francis College Literary Prize for 2017. This biennial prize awards US$50,000 to an author for their 3rd to 5th published work of fiction.

Eligible authors can be based anywhere in the world and there are no age or citizenship restrictions. Nominated books can also be published anywhere in the world, although only English-language books may be entered (translations accepted). Uniquely, self-published books are also eligible for consideration.

In order to be eligible for the 2017 prize, the nominated work needs to have been published between June 2015 and May 2017. 

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Ready, set, type!
[Maksim Kabakou/Shutterstock]

A post by Sally O’Reilly

We live in a culture obsessed with speed: fast-food, Twitter, overnight celebrity, instant make-overs and cutting edge techno-gadgets. We drive too fast, desperate to get ahead literally as well as metaphorically. And when we get home we surf TV, scroll through Facebook, eat, drink and talk on the phone. Apparently, the only thing we want to slow down in the modern world is the ageing process – and it’s no surprise that our solution to that problem is a quick injection of Botox or a lunch-time facelift.

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Hollie Overton - Baby Doll Interview

Hollie Overton is a Chicago-born, Texas-raised writer who has worked on a number of television series including Cold Case, The Client List and Shadowhunters, the series based on Cassandra Clare’s international bestseller The Mortal Instruments.

Hollie’s debut novel, Baby Doll, is out this month. We contacted her to find out more about her experience writing both scripts and books.

You didn’t study creative writing or English Literature at college, but instead acting. Do you think this background as a performer impacts your approach to storytelling? 
Acting was my first love and those skills I learned have been invaluable as both as a TV writer and now a novelist.  I fell in love with performing in middle school and high school.  I learned how to tell stories by analyzing plays, breaking down characters and studying structure. I spent years studying acting and all that knowledge informs everything I write. I visual things that I’m writing, how will it look, is it authentic. The same goes for dialogue.  How would it sound if an actor were saying those words? Even though I didn’t continue my acting pursuits, I’m so grateful for the training and that it led me down this career path.

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