Literary Magazines for New and Unpublished Writers 2016

Our previous lists of magazines that welcome submissions from new and previously unpublished writers (see here and here) have both received a huge amount of positive feedback. So, by popular demand, here are 15 more literary magazines that are happy to hear from writers who may not had their work published before.

Before you rush to start sending your latest story to every magazine on the list, Eva Langston from Carve Magazine has some excellent advice to help you avoid the mistakes writers most commonly make when submitting their work for publication. Also check out this step-by-step guide to submitting your work from the editorial team at Neon.

1. The City Quill
is a new literary magazine exclusively for previously unpublished writers (they won’t hold school newspapers or personal blogs against you but you shouldn’t submit your work to The City Quill if you ever had a journal, anthology or magazine). Fiction writers may submit up to two stories of 2500 words each, and non-fiction and poetry are also accepted. You don’t need to pay a submission fee but, for a small charge, you can have your work read and critiqued by a City Quill editor within two weeks.

2. Spry
is a literary journal that features undiscovered writers, as well as the work of more established voices. The editors, two recent graduates of the MFA program at Fairfield University, seek work that is concise, experimental, hybrid, or flashy and all submissions are read blind. Submissions for issue eight are currently open.
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Mistakes Writers Make When Submitting to Literary Magazines
In this guest post Eva Langston from Carve Magazine shares ten of the most common mistakes writers make when submitting their work.

1. Not reading literary magazines

This seems obvious, but if you want to get published in a journal, it’s helpful to read the types of pieces they publish. Most literary magazines suggest you read a few back issues first to get a sense of their aesthetic. In an ideal world, you should do this, but chances are you don’t have time to read multiple back issues of every single journal you’re going to submit to. Instead, make it your goal to simply read more literary magazines than you currently do. Subscribe to a few each year. Get your friends to subscribe to different publications and then trade. And of course, take advantage of free online journals, such as Carve. Read a story whenever you have a spare moment, even if it’s on your phone while waiting in line at the grocery store.

2. Not submitting your best work

Instead of finishing a story and submitting it immediately, let your piece rest for a few months then go back and revise. Workshop it, or let a trusted writer friend read it and give feedback. Print it out and triple-check for grammatical and spelling errors. Read your piece out loud at least once. Only submit when you think the piece is the best it can possibly be.

3. Not following guidelines

Double check all guidelines before submitting to a magazine. Is there a word count requirement? Should your name be removed from the piece? Should your document be in Word, PDF, or rich text format? If it’s an email submission, do they want the document attached, or pasted into the body of the email? Do they accept simultaneous submissions? Don’t risk getting your piece being tossed out because you didn’t follow the rules.

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Small and independent magazines are the lifeblood of the literary scene, providing many emerging writers with their first chance to have their work published. Here are five new literary magazines accepting submissions this August.

Two Cities Review

Two Cities Review

Two Cities Review (USA) launched its inaugural issue in (the northern hemisphere’s) Spring 2014. Published quarterly, the editors are looking for “high-quality fiction, poetry and creative non-fiction that bridges the gap between forms, genres, or realities”. They interpret this loosely, but are especially excited by work that crosses form or genre in a new and exciting way. Submissions can be up to 3000 words and simultaneous submissions are accepted.
Read more about Two Cities Review

 

Pear Drop

Pear Drop

Pear Drop: A Journal of Art and Literature (UK and USA) aims to tell stories that document and explore the human condition from all perspectives. It published its first issue in March 2015 and its most recent issue (#3) carried the theme ‘Untitled: A Discussion on Feminism’. Pear Drop  is currently seeking flash fiction submissions of up to 500 words for its next issue with the theme ‘Law Enforcement: The Theatre of Crime & Punishment’. The deadline is 1 September.
Read more about Pear Drop

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Publication Opportunities for Writers in June and July 2015

Over 40 publication opportunities for both established and emerging writers.

Please check the relevant websites for all terms and conditions. 

McSweeney’s Quarterly
is currently accepting unsolicited submissions of fiction and non-fiction. There are no style restrictions and McSweeney’s are keen to discover and nurture new and developing writers, but writers should be aware that the response time can be fairly lengthy.

Paper and Ink Zine
is seeking submissions for a forthcoming issue on the theme Childhood.  It accepts short stories, poetry, flash fiction, memoirs and more up to 1500 words Submissions close 1 June.

The Quotable
is a quarterly print and online publication. Submissions for its 17th issue on the theme Accommodation close on 1 June. They are seeking flash fiction (up to 1000 words), short fiction (up to 3000 words), and creative non-fiction (up to 3000 words), as well as poetry and art.

Oxford American
welcomes fiction, non-fiction, and poetry submissions, as well as proposals for Points South and feature articles. Submissions for the Fall 2015 issue close on 1 June.

Literary Journal of the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library
is accepting submissions for its fourth annual issue. The theme is social justice. The journal accepts submissions of poetry, creative non-fiction, short fiction, original artwork, and/or photography related to the theme. The deadline is 1 June.

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Publication Opportunities for Writers: May and June 2015

Over 50 publication opportunities for both established and emerging writers.

Please check the relevant websites for all terms and conditions. 

The O. Henry Prize Stories
is an annual collection of the year’s twenty best stories published in American and Canadian magazines. Entries must be submitted by the magazine’s editors and should reach the series editor, Laura Furman, by 1 May. The 20 stories selected for the 2014 O. Henry Prize collection are available here.

Prairie Schooner
was established in 1926. Its intention is to publish the best writing available, both from beginning and established writers. Submissions close 1 May.

Diverse Voices Quarterly
aims to be an outlet for and by everyone: every age, race, gender, sexual orientation and religious background. Submissions received by 1 May will be considered for the August/September issue.

Southampton Review
is dedicated to “discovering new voices and visions while savoring long-standing favorites”. Some of the established writers it has published include Billy Collins, Meg Wolitzer, Frank McCourt and David Rakoff. The current reading period closes on 1 May.

Pilcrow & Dagger
is accepting submissions for its July 2015 issue. The theme is A Mid Summer’s Night Dream and pieces may be up to 5000 words.

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