Friday Aerogramme: News and Updates from Aerogramme Writers' Studio

This week we’re honoured to post a guest article by Kenn Adams, the original creator of The Story Spine. You’ve probably read about the story spine before; it’s one of Pixar’s 22 Rules of Storytelling.
Quirk Books are currently running an unpublished manuscript competition. The winner will a $10,000 and publication of their novel.
The incomparable Judy Blume is doing an AMA (Ask Me Anything) on Reddit on 11 June.
A.M. Holmes has been announced as the winner of the 2013 Women’s Prize for Fiction (formerly the Orange Prize). It was also announced that Baileys will be the prize’s main sponsor in 2014.
Looking for a quiet place to write? Why not rent an old gaol cell for just $180 a month (seriously!)
Live in London and looking for a job in book publicity? Penguin Books UK are hiring.
Prada Journal is a new international creative writing contest launched by high-fashion brand Prada.   Entries can be in any language and the winner receives €5,000. For more writing competitions check out our June and July Opportunities for Writers list.
Malorie Blackman has been announced as the UK’s new children’s laureate. In this post for Bloomsbury’s Writers and Artists site she shares her tips for writing genre fiction for kids.
The San Francisco Chronicle has launched a new books blog. The first post is a Q and A with Mark Bowden, author of The Finish: The Killing of Osama bin Laden. 
Max Barry is a wonderful writer from our home town of Melbourne. We posted his thoughts on editing a couple of months ago. His new book, Lexicon, will be released in just over week in the US and UK.
Start saving your pocket money: Oborne and Little now stock a Penguin Books themed Wallpaper.
Penguin Books themed wallpaper
Finally, from our Facebook page

to kill a mockingbird

 Enjoy your weekend!


Letterbox image courtesy of Upon A Fold. Reproduced with permission.


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Quirk Books' $10,000 Fiction Contest

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Back to the Story Spine by Kenn Adams - aerogrammestudio.com
A guest post by Kenn Adams. Kenn is a teacher, author and the Artistic Director of Synergy Theater.

I created the Story Spine in 1991 and, over the years, I’ve been thrilled to watch more and more people use it, teach it, discuss it, and even modify it in order to make it their own. One of my favorite modifications is the addition of “And, the moral of the story is…” at the very end. Over time, however, some of its permutations have become less powerful, I think, than the original due to a missing link here or a different word there. So, I’m happy to present it here in its original 8-line format along with a brief analysis, a couple of interesting examples, and some tips on how to best make use of it.

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The Oxford Comma
“There are people who embrace the Oxford comma and those who don’t, and I’ll just say this: never get between these people when drink has been taken.”
– Lynne Truss, Eats, Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation
Infographic via onlineschools.com 


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‘If you allow your people to talk, they will express themselves in a way that the writer might not have thought of.’
Joyce Carol Oates is the critically acclaimed author of over forty novels including The Falls and We Were the Mulvaneys. In this video recorded by fora.tv, Oates discusses how a writer can develop realistic characters, using examples from her 2007 novel The Gravedigger’s Daughter. She also outlines a useful creative writing exercise that she provides her students.


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