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Neil Gaiman's 8 Rules of Writing

  1. Write
  2. Put one word after another. Find the right word, put it down.
  3. Finish what you’re writing. Whatever you have to do to finish it, finish it.
  4. Put it aside. Read it pretending you’ve never read it before. Show it to friends whose opinion you respect and who like the kind of thing that this is.
  5. Remember: when people tell you something’s wrong or doesn’t work for them, they are almost always right. When they tell you exactly what they think is wrong and how to fix it, they are almost always wrong.
  6. Fix it. Remember that, sooner or later, before it ever reaches perfection, you will have to let it go and move on and start to write the next thing. Perfection is like chasing the horizon. Keep moving.
  7. Laugh at your own jokes.
  8. The main rule of writing is that if you do it with enough assurance and confidence, you’re allowed to do whatever you like. (That may be a rule for life as well as for writing. But it’s definitely true for writing.) So write your story as it needs to be written. Write it ­honestly, and tell it as best you can. I’m not sure that there are any other rules. Not ones that matter.

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Montreal International Poetry PrizeEntries are now open for the Montreal International Poetry Prize. The winner of the prize will receive a cash prize of CA $20,000 (approximately US $19,500 or GBP £ 12,900). The prize is open to original, unpublished poems up to 40 lines long. Entrants can be from anywhere in the world and do not need to be previously published poets.

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Writing Advice from Elmore Leonard

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Nominated in the Graphic Novel/ Comics category, Unterzakhn by Leela Corman is about immigrant life on New York’s Lower East Side at the turn of the twentieth century

Nominated in the Graphic Novel/ Comics category, Unterzakhn by Leela Corman is about immigrant life on New York’s Lower East Side at the turn of the twentieth century

The Los Angeles Times first awarded book prizes in 1980. The 2013 Los Angeles Time Book Prizes will be awarded to the best books across ten categories, published in the United States in the previous calendar year.

Uniquely, the categories include genres popular with readers such as Mystery/Thriller and Graphic Novel / Comics, as well as more traditional literary categories such as poetry and biography.

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