“It’s very difficult to do happiness in novels in a sustained way.”

In this video recorded by the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art earlier this year, Ian McEwan reflects on making romantic love work in fiction, the amazing evolution of the novel as a genre, and the mature writer as a toddler of old age.

Ian McEwan has been nominated for the Man Booker Prize six times, winning the prize in 1998 for Amsterdam. His most recent novel, Sweet Tooth, was published in 2012.

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‘Anyone who makes something for its own sake, whether you try to have it published or whether you’re just rearranging twigs on the ground because it pleases you, people who do that are artists.’

Jonathan Safran Foer is one of the most celebrated writers working in the English language today. He is best know for his two novels, Everything is Illuminated and Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, and for his first major work of non-fiction, Eating Animals. In this video recorded by  Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, View Post

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“There’s no reason why the simple shape of stories can’t be fed into computers, they have beautiful shapes.” — Kurt Vonnegut

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Filmed at the Melbourne Writers’ Festival in 2008, cult American writer David Sedaris reflects on some of the quirks of his homeland.
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1. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: The Danger of a Single Story

Our lives, our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories. Novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie tells the story of how she found her authentic cultural voice — and warns that if we hear only a single story about another person or country, we risk a critical misunderstanding.

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