Back to the Story Spine by Kenn Adams - aerogrammestudio.com
A guest post by Kenn Adams. Kenn is a teacher, author and the Artistic Director of Synergy Theater.

I created the Story Spine in 1991 and, over the years, I’ve been thrilled to watch more and more people use it, teach it, discuss it, and even modify it in order to make it their own. One of my favorite modifications is the addition of “And, the moral of the story is…” at the very end. Over time, however, some of its permutations have become less powerful, I think, than the original due to a missing link here or a different word there. So, I’m happy to present it here in its original 8-line format along with a brief analysis, a couple of interesting examples, and some tips on how to best make use of it.

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How to get permission to use song lyrics in your book

A guest post by Virginia Lloyd. Virginia is an Australian literary agent, editor and freelance writer. Sydney-born, she currently lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Two of my clients have been surprised recently to learn that they are responsible for obtaining permission to reproduce song lyrics in their respective novels. I’m sorry to break it to you, authors, but if you want to reproduce anything by another artist in your book – a painting, a few lines from a poem, song lyrics, a photograph – you have to identify who owns the copyright and contact that person (often a company or a literary estate) for permission to do so.

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10 Great Podcasts for WritersPodcasts are a fantastic (free!) way to gain new skills and perspectives for your writing. They can also help you to keep up with the latest industry news and trends. Here are 10 of the best.

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Twitter Hashtags for WritersTwitter has over 500 million users around the world, with everyone from pop stars to politicians signing up to join the social networking and micro-blogging site.

For writers, Twitter has the potential to greatly benefit your career. Twitter can better connect you with your readers, provide you with networking opportunities with other creative wordsmiths and, importantly, help you to find new audiences for your work.

Hashtags play a very important role in effectively communicating through Twitter. People use the hashtag symbol # before a relevant keyword or phrase (no spaces) in their Tweet to categorise those Tweets and help them show up more easily in Twitter Search.

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A guest post by Brian McDonald

Ever since Quentin Tarantino’s film Pulp Fiction was released, people have talked in awe about how that film and others have played with traditional notions of story structure. That film tells its story out of sequence and is therefore innovative, or so the reasoning goes. This is a mistake. Telling stories out of sequence is actually as traditional as it gets.

The idea that story structure is ruled by linear chronology is a common error. As I have often written, and told students, one must look at how stories are told in real life. One must study stories not in their written form, or some other medium like TV or films, but in their natural habitat.

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