29 Publication Opportunities in October and November 2018

Publication Opportunities for Writers October and November 2018

Deadlines and details do sometimes change. Please don’t forget to check the relevant websites for all the latest details.

Lost Balloon
publishes flash fiction, flash nonfiction, and prose poetry (all 1,000 words or less). One publish one new piece is published every Wednesday. There are no theme or genre restrictions and the editors seek work that “entertains and challenges, that pushes boundaries and breaks hearts.” Submissions are open between the 1st and 7th of October and the 1st  and 7th of November.

Talem Press
an imprint of The Writer’s Edit is currently open for full-length manuscript submissions. Talem Press publishes fantasy fiction that empowers its readers and describes itself as “a house that’s particularly passionate about unlikely heroines, mysterious magic and out-of-this-world story-telling.” The deadline is 12 October.

Indiana Review
is currently accepting submissions of fiction, non-fiction, poetry, translation and visual arts. Prose submissions may be up to 8000 words and poets may submit between three and six poems per submission. The deadline is 15 October.

Fiction
is a semiannual publication established in 1972. It is looking for the best new writing available, leaning toward the unconventional, and accepts a variety of genres: experimental, satire, literary, translations, and contemporary. Submissions reopen on 15 October.

Hunger Mountain
is a print journal based in Vermont. It publishes fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, visual art, young adult and children’s writing, and literary miscellany. Submissions are open until 15 October. Hunger Mountain also runs four annual contests for writers.

Tin House
is accepting submissions for its first three issues of 2019 – two open, unthemed issues and one themed The Horror. Submissions close on 15 November.

Litro Magazine
is inviting submissions of short fiction, flash/micro fiction, and nonfiction for a Freedom themed print issue. The recommended word limit in 4,000 words. Submissions close on 19 October.

NonBinary Review
is a quarterly interactive literary journal that joins many stories around each issue’s theme. The editors invite authors to explore each theme in any way that speaks to them including rewriting a familiar story from a new point of view, mashing genres together or writing a personal essay about some aspect of the selected theme. NonBinary review is currently accepting submissions for issue 19 on Dante’s Inferno. The deadline is 24 October.

Fiyah
is a quarterly speculative fiction magazine that features stories by and about people of the African Diaspora. Submissions for an unthemed issue are open until 31 October.

Lunch Ticket
is a biannual journal published by the MFA community of Antioch University of Los Angeles. Submissions of fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, writing for young people and visual art for its Winter/Spring issue close on 31 October.

Room Magazine
is Canada’s oldest feminist literary journal, and has published fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, art, interviews, and book reviews for forty years. The editors are currently accepting submissions for an unthemed issue – fiction, poetry and creative non-fiction on any theme. Closes 31 October.

Puerto Del Sol
now in its 53rd year of publication, is published by MFA candidates at New Mexico State University. It is currently seeking submissions of poetry and prose that engage the theme of absence. The deadline is 31 October.

Post Road
is based in Boston and accepts unsolicited poetry, fiction, nonfiction, short plays and monologues, and visual art. Submissions for the summer issue close on 31 October.

The Ilanot Review
is an international journal based in Israel. Submissions of poetry and creative nonfiction/hybrid are being accepted until 31 October for an issue around the theme Crisis. The editors particularly welcome pieces that address contemporary crises – from the political and environmental – and rethink the ways in which poetry engages and responds to crisis in real time.

Bat City Review
is seeking submissions for its 15th issue – poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, art, and cross-genre pieces that experiment with language, form, and unconventional subject matter. Submissions close on 1 November.

Foreshadow: A Serial YA Anthology
will be published monthly online for a single year starting in January 2019 and ending December 2019, and will feature stellar YA stories from established and emerging authors. Each issue will feature three stories, one of which will be from a new voice specially selected by a beloved author. Original YA short stories of between 2000 and 7000 will be considered. The next deadline is 1 November.

SAND
is an English-language literary journal published twice annually in Berlin. It features prose and poetry, translations, art and photography. Submissions reopen on 1 November.

Chronically Lit
aims to examine and expand the representation of chronic illness in contemporary literature, media, and culture. The editors are currently looking for writing and art related to chronic illness for publication on its website.

Ninth Letter
is accepting submissions of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry for a special online edition to be published in Winter 2019. The theme for this issue is Haunting. Submissions are open until 4 November.

The Emma Press
is looking for poems inspired by the gothic, for an anthology edited by Nisha Bhakoo and Charlotte Geater. If you would like to submit, please send a maximum of three poems by 9 November

The Boiler
was founded in 2011 by a group of writers at Sarah Lawrence College. It publishes new and emerging writers on a quarterly basis. Winter issue submissions are open until 15 November.

Luna Station Quarterly
publishes speculative fiction written by emerging women authors. Submissions close on 15 November and stories should be between 500 to 7000 words in length.

Lamplight 
is a quarterly magazine of dark fiction, both short stories and flash fiction. The quarterly is published as print and ebook, and at the end of the year, all the quarterlies are bound together in an annual collection. Submissions close on 15 November.

The A3 Review
is seeking contributions under 150 words on the theme Hats. The editors welcome submissions of prose, poetry, graphic stories, photography, paintings, drawings, and other visual and word-based creations. Submissions are due by 23 November.

Tahoma Literary Review
is published three times a year in both print and digital formats. Fiction, nonfiction and poetry submissions are open until 30 November. For fiction submissions, writers are asked to submit one short story or novel excerpt between 1,500 and 10,000 words.  Nonfiction submissions should be between 1500 and 7000 words.

Matador Review
is accepting submissions for its eleventh issue. It considers fiction, creative non-fiction, essays, flash fiction, poetry, book reviews and visual art. Submissions close on 30 November.
Read our Q&A with founder and editor-in-chief JT Lachausse.

Michigan Quarterly Review
is an interdisciplinary journal of arts and culture that seeks to combine the best of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction with outstanding critical essays on literary, cultural, social, and political matters. Submissions for open until 30 November and the editors try to include at least one story, essay or poem by a previously unpublished writer in every issue.

Baltimore Review
was founded by Barbara Westwood Diehl in 1996 as a literary journal publishing short stories and poems, with a mission to showcase the best writing from the Baltimore area, from across the U.S., and beyond. Submissions are open until 30 November.

The Letters Page
is a literary journal in letters, published by the School of English at the University of Nottingham and edited by Jon McGregor. It publishes essays, stories, poetry, memoir, travelogue, and criticism; but all in the form of letters. Submissions for Volume 4 close in December.

For some extra tips before submitting your work, read our popular posts on How to Submit Your Writing to Literary Magazines and Mistakes Writers Make When Submitting to Literary Magazines.

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