A guest post by Yi Shun Lai

Since 2014 I have edited prose for the Tahoma Literary Review. This submission period we had a little over a thousand submissions; by the time I’m done, I will have read somewhere between 350 and 400 pieces of fiction and given feedback on a little over half of those. (We have awesome fiction readers at TLR to help with the remainder of the workload, and poetry makes up a massive chunk of those thousand submissions.)

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Image: Ernest Hemingway with a bull near Pamplona, Spain in 1927, two years before A Farewell to Arms would be published.
Ernest Hemingway Photograph Collection, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston.

A guest post by Verna Kale

When he published The Sun Also Rises in 1926, Ernest Hemingway was well-known among the expatriate literati of Paris and to cosmopolitan literary circles in New York and Chicago. But it was A Farewell to Arms, published in October 1929, that made him a celebrity.

With this newfound fame, Hemingway learned, came fan mail. Lots of it. And he wasn’t really sure how to deal with the attention.

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The Moth Poetry Prize 2017
Entries are now being accepted for one of the world’s richest poetry prizes, the newly named Moth Poetry Prize. The winner of the 2017 prize will receive €10,000 (approximately US$11,700), with three runners-up to receive €1,000 each.

The Moth Poetry Prize, formerly known as the Ballymaloe International Poetry Prize, is for a single, original poem that has not been published in any form (including being self-published or published online). The prize is open to all poets, both established and emerging, and there are no restrictions on nationality or citizenship. An entry fee of  €12 is payable and multiple entries are accepted.

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