Archives For Publishing

Granta is Accepting Unsolicited Submissions

After a six-month hiatus Granta, one of the world’s most prestigious literary magazines, is again accepting unsolicited submissions.

Granta’s history can be traced back to 1889 when a student politics and literature magazine called The Granta was founded at Cambridge University. Since its relaunch 35 years ago, Granta has been a quarterly literary journal, with the aim of publishing the best new writing.

Granta publishes fiction, non-fiction and poetry. There are no strict word limits, though most prose submissions are between 3000 and 6000 words and the editors advise they are unlikely to read more than 10,000 words of any submission.

Alongside the print edition, the online new writing program publishes stories, poems, essays, interviews, animations and more from established Granta alumni as well as new voices.

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What We Look for in Unsolicted Submissions

A guest post by Kim Winternheimer, editor of The Masters Review

The Masters Review is a publication that focuses entirely on new and emerging writers, offering a quality platform for readers, agents, and editors to discover new voices. In addition to our printed anthology, we have submission opportunities year round including a short story award for new writers, workshops, and a fiction contest running throughout September and October with guest judge Jeff VanderMeer. Nearly all the stories we publish are unsolicited, which means most of our work comes from the slush pile. So how do you make your story stand out? Here’s what we look for when reading stories.

1. Clarity 

Especially at the beginning of a piece. Assume any story you submit is being read by editors who are also reading many other stories that week, day, or even hour. A difficult beginning is disastrous because it informs the reader’s opinion on the rest of the story, making her less forgiving of small errors or lulls later. The start of your story should read clearly on the sentence level and avoid too much exposition or throat clearing. Our favorite pieces show intention, finesse, and clarity from the start, and introduce the story in a way that is easy to understand, even if the piece is experimenting with structure or other style.

2. A Good Hook 

The opening line in this year’s anthology is: “Almost everyone agreed that the death of Rodrigo Bradley had been an accident.” This is a great example of a piece that begins in the action of the story. When reading a large number of submissions, it helps to begin with a plot element that immediately draws readers into the world and has them wondering: “What will happen next?”

3. Productive Ambiguity 

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Small and independent magazines are the lifeblood of the literary scene, providing many emerging writers with their first chance to have their work published. Here are five new literary magazines accepting submissions this August.

Two Cities Review

Two Cities Review

Two Cities Review (USA) launched its inaugural issue in (the northern hemisphere’s) Spring 2014. Published quarterly, the editors are looking for “high-quality fiction, poetry and creative non-fiction that bridges the gap between forms, genres, or realities”. They interpret this loosely, but are especially excited by work that crosses form or genre in a new and exciting way. Submissions can be up to 3000 words and simultaneous submissions are accepted.
Read more about Two Cities Review


Pear Drop

Pear Drop

Pear Drop: A Journal of Art and Literature (UK and USA) aims to tell stories that document and explore the human condition from all perspectives. It published its first issue in March 2015 and its most recent issue (#3) carried the theme ‘Untitled: A Discussion on Feminism’. Pear Drop  is currently seeking flash fiction submissions of up to 500 words for its next issue with the theme ‘Law Enforcement: The Theatre of Crime & Punishment’. The deadline is 1 September.
Read more about Pear Drop

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The Times Children's Fiction Competition: Entries Close 18 December

The Times / Chicken House Children’s Fiction Competition is now open for entries. The winning writer will receive a worldwide publishing contract with Chicken House with a royalty advance of £10,000 (US$15,6000), plus representation from a top children’s literary agent.

The Times / Chicken House Children’s Fiction Competition began in 2007 and has launched the careers of a number of new authors. In 2014 the prize was won by Kerr Thomson for his beautiful book The Sound of Whales

To enter this competition you must have written a completed full-length novel suitable for children aged somewhere between 7 and 18 years. By full-length the organisers suggest a minimum of 30,000 words and ask that manuscripts do not exceed 80,000 words in length.

The competition is open to writers around the world, regardless of nationality or residency status. To enter, writers are asked to submit the full manuscript in hard copy, accompanied by:

  • a one page synopsis of the story
  • a chapter-by-chapter plot plan
  • a cover letter including a brief biography and an explanation of why you believe the work would appeal to children.

All entries must be accompanied by a £15 fee. Previously submitted manuscripts can be re-entered and self-published works are also eligible for entry. All longlisted entrants will receive a reader’s report of their work.

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10 Publication Opportunities for Young Writers

Writers like Françoise Sagan, Sonya Hartnett and S.E. Hinton demonstrate that youth doesn’t have to be a barrier to literary success. Here is a list of 10 magazines, journals and websites that are committed to publishing young writers and that champion the work of those just starting out.
If you have never submitted your work for publication before, we highly recommend reading How to Submit Your Writing to Literary Magazines, a practical step-by-step guide from the editors of Neon Literary Magazine.

Cadaverine Magazine
believes in showcasing contemporary, innovative and original new writing from the next generation of literary talent. It welcomes submissions of literary fiction, poetry and reviews by writers under the age of 30. Cadaverine Magazine is based in the UK but welcomes international submissions. Cadaverine’s editors may suggest changes or ask you to resubmit an edited draft to help you develop your work. They ask that writers only submit work if they are willing to participate in this editorial process.

is an American online magazine created by fashion blogger Tavi Gevinson in 2011, then aged just 15, with Jane Pratt (founding editor of Sassy) and Ira Glass (This American Life) among its many high-profile supporters. The site has monthly themed content, with updates three times every weekday, and once a day on weekends, and every school year the editors compile the best from the site into a printed yearbook  There are no restrictions on the age of contributors and all written pieces should be at least 800 words long (except poems). Rookie’s April 2015 theme is ‘Both Sides Now’.

Claremont Review
is based in British Columbia and publishes young artists, aged 13 to 19 from anywhere in the English-speaking world. It accepts poetry, short stories, short plays, graphic art, photography, and interviews twice a year in the spring/summer and fall/winter. The Claremont Review’s website includes a resources section with tips and examples of the types of work it publishes.

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Polish Your Prose: An Editorial Cheat Sheet

A guest post by literary agent Nephele Tempest.

No matter your resolutions for the year, regardless where you stand with your current writing project, the time will come when you need to edit. I don’t mean rework your plot, heighten dramatic tension, or beef up your protagonist’s motivations. Rather I’m referring to that nitty gritty editorial process of looking at your work word by word, sentence by sentence, and examining the language you’ve used. Do your descriptions dance on the page? Have any clichés snuck into the mix? If you had to read aloud in front of an audience, would you find yourself running out of breath?

Sentence-level editing involves more than checking for missing words or making sure your Find-and-Replace changed a character’s name all the way through your manuscript. This is your chance to shape up your prose and show your skills, not just as a storyteller but as a wordsmith. But a manuscript can be a fairly long document, and sometimes it’s hard to remember everything you want to check as you work your way through from first page to last.

Here’s a handy cheat sheet of things you might want to keep in mind while editing:

  1. Cut your adverbs and make your verbs stronger.
  2. Rework any clichés.
  3. Eliminate filler words and phrases, such as “currently”, “that”, and “in order to.”
  4. Refer to people as “who” not “that.”
  5. Cut repetitious words and/or phrases.
  6. Divide long, hard-to-read sentences into two or more shorter sentences.
  7. Fix any inadvertent double negatives in long, complex sentences.
  8. Hyphenate modifying words.
  9. Minimize use of “very” and “really.”
  10. Beware of overusing passive voice/passive verb structures (is/was/-ing verbs).
  11. Double check the definitions of any words you’re not 100% sure you know.
  12. Determine and weed out any words, actions, or punctuation that you personally overuse as filler, such as characters smiling or taking deep breaths, ellipses in the middle or end of dialogue, exclamation points, etc.
  13. Replace general words with specific ones, such as “thing(s)” or “stuff.”
  14. Cut unnecessary chit-chat from dialogue; limit conversations to substance that moves your story forward.
  15. Limit distinctive dialogue quirks or movements to a single character; don’t give “signature” details to more than one person unless there’s a reason (child emulating a parent or older sibling, etc.).

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Writers – Have You Considered Sending Your Work Overseas?

In this guest post Tania Hershman, co-author of Writing Short Stories: A Writers’ and Artists’ Companion, explains why writers should look beyond their own backyards when considering where to submit their work.

I set up ShortStops in November 2013 because the short story has a bit of an image problem around here, here being the UK & Ireland. The thing is, there is so much fantastic short story activity – but the other thing is, no-one knows about it. There was no one place where we could all jump up and down and celebrate! I was hoping someone else might do this first (since I should really be focussing on my own writing, sigh) but seemed as though it wasn’t going to happen and so ShortStops was born.

It emerged from a list I’d been keeping for several years on my blog of literary magazines in the UK & Ireland that publish short stories. I started the list just for me and it has grown and grown and generated so much interest, I thought it deserved a site of its own, where each lit mag has its own page and can publish blog posts with calls for submissions, announcements of new issues etc… The second exciting strand is the live lit events, which for me are injecting new life into short stories – writers or actors reading, audiences loving being read to! So we have listings of those events too, each has its own page and organisers put up news on the blog. As well as these two, there is an ever-growing list of UK & Irish short story collection authors, and I hope to be adding info on publishers, writing workshops and more.

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