Archives For Novellas

Literary magazine Prairie Schooner is currently accepting fiction and poetry manuscripts for its popular annual book prize contest. The winners will each receive US$3000 and publication through the University of Nebraska Press.

Entries must unpublished and fit into one of two categories:

  • fiction collections of at least 150 pages comprised either entirely of short stories or one novella along with short stories
  • poetry collections of at least 50 pages

The competition is open to writers worldwide, and both unpublished and published writers are welcome to enter. Entries can be submitted electronically or in hard copy, and a reading fee of $25 is payable.

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Prairie Schooner Book Prize

Literary magazine Prairie Schooner is currently accepting fiction and poetry manuscripts for its popular annual book prize contest. The winners will each receive US$3000 and publication through the University of Nebraska Press.

Entries must unpublished and fit into one of two categories:

  • fiction collections of at least 150 pages comprised either entirely of short stories or one novella along with short stories
  • poetry collections of at least 50 pages

The competition is open to writers worldwide, and both unpublished and published writers are welcome to enter. Entries can be submitted electronically or in hard copy, and a reading fee of $25 is payable.

Continue Reading…

Top Ten Tips for Writing Novellas

A guest post Dan Peacock, 2014 Project Coordinator for The Novella Award.

1. Plan, plan, plan

Many writers think that because of their length, novellas are something they can just sit down and write. This is not the case. As with the novella’s longer cousin, the novel, it needs to be planned thoroughly beforehand. What’s the point of writing ten thousand words only to realise the story has reached its conclusion? Forward planning using any stimulus such as the snowflake method or a simple brainstorm can make the difference between a novella and another short story.

2. Describe your novella in one sentence

Novellas have simple plots and minimal characters. If it is not possible to describe this in a single sentence, the idea will likely become a full-blown novel when written. The key aspects of a novella are its simple plot and few central characters. If the plot can’t be described in a sentence, the idea may be suited more for a novel than a novella.

3. Start with conflict

Creating a conflict in the first few pages of a novella will draw in the reader and encourage them to continue reading. This could be anything from a battle of life and death or something going missing. Create a conflict that the character must face early on and the reader will be enticed to find out how this conflict is resolved, if at all.

4. Consider writing in the first person

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