Archives For Competitions

Boulevard Short Fiction Contest for Emerging Writers 2015

Boulevard is accepting entries for its annual short fiction contest for emerging writers. The winner will receive US$1500 and have their story published in the magazine.

Boulevard is an American literary magazine established in 1985 and based at St. Louis University in Missouri. Boulevard aims to publish the finest in fiction, poetry and non-fiction and was described by Poet Laureate Daniel Hoffman as ‘one of the half-dozen best literary journals’. The magazine has been edited throughout its history by Richard Burgin, a five-time Pushcart Prize winner.

Boulevard’s Short Fiction Contest for Emerging Writers is open people who have not yet published a book of fiction, poetry or creative non-fiction with a nationally distributed press. Stories may be up to 8000 words and must be previously unpublished.

The 2014 contest was won by Courtney Sender for her story ‘The Disappearance of J. Frank Donaldson’.

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The Sunday Times Short Story Award 2016: Entries Now Open for the World’s Richest Short Story Prize

Writers from around the world are invited to enter the 2016 Sunday Times EFG Short Story Award. The winner will receive £30,000 (US$46,500), making this the most valuable prize for a single short story in the world.

The prize is for stories up to 6000 words in length and there is no entry fee. Stories can be either unpublished or published. If published, the work must have first appeared after 1 January 2015.

Writers can enter regardless of their nationality or residency but they must have an existing record of publication in creative writing in the UK and Ireland. In 2015 the award went to Chinese-American author Yiyun Li. Other past winners include Junot Diaz, Adam Johnson and CK Stead.

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Entries for Boston Review’s 2016 Short Story Contest Are Now Open

Boston Review is now accepting entries for the Aura Estrada Short Story Contest 2016.

Founded in 1975, Boston Review is one of America’s most prestigious literature and politics magazines. Past contributors include Saul Bellow, Jhumpa Lahiri and John Updike.

Boston Review’s Aura Estrada Short Story Contest is open to all writers, regardless of citizenship or publication history. The winner of the contest will receive $1500 and have his or her work published in the July/August 2016 issue of Boston Review. The runners-up stories may also be published.

The 2016 contest will be judged by Jennifer Egan, winner of the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction for A Visit from the Goon Squad.

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Literary magazine Bartleby Snopes was founded by Nathaniel Tower in 2008. In 2010 it was named as one of Flavorwire’s ‘Top Ten Online Literary Magazines You Should Be Reading’. Bartleby Snopes currently publishes two stories per week and holds a regular Story of the Month competition. Bartleby Snopes also publishes a free downloadable magazine every January and July.

In 2015 Bartleby Snopes is running its 7th Annual Dialogue Only Writing Contest. Entrants are asked to create an original story of up to 2000 words composed entirely of dialogue. To help writers meet this challenge, the editors have composed the following very useful tips. 

Dialogue Writing Tips from Bartleby Snopes

Every year, Bartleby Snopes Literary Magazine hosts a dialogue-only writing contest. Submissions must consist of nothing but dialogue. You can have as many characters as you want, but you can’t have any tag lines or any narration. If it sounds easy, then you are probably doing it wrong.

During the six years we’ve hosted the contest, we have read hundreds of dialogue stories. Here are some things we have learned in the process. Even if you don’t plan to submit to the contest, we think these tips will help you create stories with great dialogue. 

Good Dialogue Should Feel Real
Many authors try to force the story to move through the dialogue. They will attempt to “cheat” by making the characters say unnatural things in order to paint the scene better. A character might say “I am going to pick up this gun right here off this table that is right next to me.” In most stories, the character would probably just pick up the gun. When you are telling a story through dialogue, you must remain true to your characters. Don’t force them to say things they wouldn’t just because it will move your plot along or paint a better picture in the reader’s head (it probably won’t). Before you start penning your dialogue-only story, take some time to listen to an actual conversation. After you’ve written your story, read it out loud and ask yourself if it actually sounds like people talking. If you can’t imagine someone saying it, then the story probably isn’t going to work. 

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The Times Children's Fiction Competition: Entries Close 18 December

The Times / Chicken House Children’s Fiction Competition is now open for entries. The winning writer will receive a worldwide publishing contract with Chicken House with a royalty advance of £10,000 (US$15,6000), plus representation from a top children’s literary agent.

The Times / Chicken House Children’s Fiction Competition began in 2007 and has launched the careers of a number of new authors. In 2014 the prize was won by Kerr Thomson for his beautiful book The Sound of Whales

To enter this competition you must have written a completed full-length novel suitable for children aged somewhere between 7 and 18 years. By full-length the organisers suggest a minimum of 30,000 words and ask that manuscripts do not exceed 80,000 words in length.

The competition is open to writers around the world, regardless of nationality or residency status. To enter, writers are asked to submit the full manuscript in hard copy, accompanied by:

  • a one page synopsis of the story
  • a chapter-by-chapter plot plan
  • a cover letter including a brief biography and an explanation of why you believe the work would appeal to children.

All entries must be accompanied by a £15 fee. Previously submitted manuscripts can be re-entered and self-published works are also eligible for entry. All longlisted entrants will receive a reader’s report of their work.

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Competitions for Writers in June and July 2015

Competitions from around the world for both established and emerging writers.

Please check the relevant websites for all terms and conditions and be aware that entry fees are payable in many cases. 

Novella Award
(previously known as MMU Novella Award) is a literary competition which celebrates new writing in the novella form. Entries must be unpublished, written in English and between 20,000 and 40,000 words. Entries close 5 June.

Narrative Magazine
awards a US$4000 new and emerging writers’ prize for the best short story, novel excerpt, poem, one-act play, graphic story, or work of literary nonfiction published in the magazine. The deadline for the 2015 award is 15 June.

Mslexia Women’s Pamphlet Competition
is for short collections of 20-24 pages of 18-20 poems. To enter, you need to be a women poet who does not have full-length collection published. First prize is publication plus £250, 25 complimentary copies of the pamphlet and a 10 per cent royalty on sales. One or more poems from the pamphlet will be published in Mslexia magazine. The competition close on 15 June.

Norton Writer’s Prize
is will be awarded annually for an outstanding essay written by an undergraduate student. Literacy narratives, literary and other textual analyses, reports, profiles, evaluations, arguments, memoirs, proposals, mixed-genre pieces, and more are eligible provided they were completed for an undergraduate writing class. Entries close 15 June.

S.D Harvey Short Story Award
is presented by the Australian Crime Writers Association and Melbourne-based literary journal Kill Your Darlings. Entries can be submitted by published and unpublished writers and can be either fiction or nonfiction stories. Closes 15 June.

American Short Fiction Contest
is open to entries between 2000 and 6500 words. It offers a first prize of US$1000 prize and publication and all entries will be considered for publication. Closes 15 June.

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$10,000 for a Single Poem: Rattle's Poetry Prize 2015

Rattle’s 10th annual poetry prize is currently open to entries. The winner will receive US$10,000 and publication in the winter issue of the magazine. Ten finalists will also be in the running for a $2000 Reader’s Choice Award.

The competition is open to writers worldwide and all entries must be previously unpublished. The entry fee is a $20 one-year subscription to Rattle (or a one-year extension for subscribers). In 2014 the prize was won by Craig van Rooyen for his poem Waiting in Vain.

Rattle also considers unsolicited submissions year round. Poets at all stages of their careers are invited to submit their work and all poems are considered on their own merit. The editors advise that they “don’t ask for or publish the standard credit-listing bios; we don’t even read them. If we like your poem better than the Poet Laureate’s, we’ll publish yours.” Contributors receive $50 and a complimentary one-year subscription to the magazine.

Entries for Rattle’s 2015 Poetry Prize close on Wednesday 15 July. For full entry details visit the Rattle website.

 

For more competitions, see our latest Opportunities for Writers post and follow Aerogramme Writers’ Studio on Facebook and Twitter.