Archives For Australia

The Elizabeth Jolley Short Story Prize is one of Australia’s most lucrative prizes for an original short story. Managed by Australian Book Review, the prize is worth a total of AUD$12,500 (approximately US$9400).

The winner of the 2017 Elizabeth Jolley Short Story Prize will receive $7000, and there are runners-up prizes of $2000 and $1000. In addition, three entries will receive judge’s commendation prizes of $850 each.

Entries are welcome from writers anywhere in the world and there are no age restrictions.

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Elizabeth Jolley Short Story Prize 2016

The Elizabeth Jolley Short Story Prize is one of Australia’s most lucrative prizes for an original short story. Managed by Australian Book Review, the prize is now worth a total of AUD$12,500 (US$9000), up from $8000 in 2015.

The winner of the 2016 Elizabeth Jolley Short Story Prize will receive $7000, and there are runners-up prizes of $2000 and $1000. In addition, three entries will receive judge’s commendation prizes of $850 each.

Entries are welcome from writers anywhere in the world and there are no age restrictions.

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We recently asked our Facebook followers which Australian writers they knew and liked. The responses included many familiar names – Peter Carey, Kate Grenville and Tim Winton and others. While these are all, of course, very fine writers, there are many more fantastic authors from our homeland that we would love for our readers to know about.

Here are just some of the great books published in Australia recently, all of which have won major prizes.

Foreign Soil by Maxine Beneba Clarke
Winner of the ABIA Literary Fiction Book of the Year

In this collection of award-winning stories, Melbourne writer Maxine Beneba Clarke has given a voice to the disenfranchised, the lost, the downtrodden and the mistreated. It will challenge you, it will have you by the heartstrings. This is contemporary fiction at its finest.

 

The Bush: Travels in the Heart of Australia by Don Watson
Winner of the Indie Book of the Year 

A milestone work of memoir, travel writing and history, The Bush takes us on a profoundly revelatory and entertaining journey through the Australian landscape and character.

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The Digital Writers' Festival Starts on 11 February

The Digital Writers’ Festival has just announced its full program for 2015. Starting on Wednesday 11 February and running for 12 days, the festival offers over 30 events and features 60 artists.

All events will be live streamed via digitalwritersfestival.com and be available to writers anywhere in the world, provided they have access to the internet. The majority events are free.

Some highlights of the program include:

Earlywords: “What Do I Look For in a First Chapter?” (free)
Explore the art of capturing an audience by gaining a deeper understanding of the critical functions of a first chapter. Gain insight into what professionals seek from your manuscript, as well as common failings, and learn techniques in the art of the hook – from bludgeoning the reader with murder and mayhem, to more subtle and nuanced ways authors create intrigue.
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ABC Open: From Page to National Stage – Writing for the National Broadcaster (free)
From memoir-style writing in the non-fiction project ‘500 Words’, to opinion pieces on current affairs for Open Drum, ABC Open invites writers to share their personal experiences on themes as diverse as racism, mental health, secret fears and relationships. Each month new writing themes are published to challenge and inspire.
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Publishing on the Feed: Social Media as a Publishing Platform (free)
Is a status update part of a real-time memoir? Is a tweet really just a form of free verse? When it comes to getting a work of microfiction into the world, is distributing it on a social network the best way to receive immediate feedback and place it before the readers that matter most? Could your Facebook Newsfeed function as an algorithmically-generated literary journal?
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Writers’ Night School: Screenwriting for the YouTube Generation (paid)
From Lena Denham to The Bondi Hipsters, tomorrow’s “Creative Geniuses” and “Voices of their Generation” will be discovered through their fully sick web series. Learning the fundamentals of online storytelling is a great way to kickstart your filmmaking career by giving you the tools to create a web series that works. This is classical storytelling refaaahshioned for the YouTube generation. Character. Concept. Plot. Audience. These aren’t just random words, they’re the building blocks of great stories.
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Elizabeth Jolley $8000 Short Story Prize: Entries Close 1 May

The Elizabeth Jolley Short Story Prize is one of Australia’s most lucrative prizes for an original short story. Managed by Australian Book Review, the prize is worth a total of AUD $8000 (US$6150) with a first prize of $5000 and supplementary prizes of $2000 and $1000.

Entries are welcome from writers anywhere in the world and there are no age restrictions.

Entries must be a single-authored short story of between 2000 and 5000 words, written in English. Stories must not have been previously published or be on offer to other prizes or publications for the duration of the prize. Multiple entries are permitted.

The three shortlisted stories will be published in September Fiction Issue of Australian Book Review and the winner will be announced at a special event at Brisbane Writers Festival.

The prize will be judged by Australian Book Rreview Deputy Editor Amy Baillieu, poet and academic Sarah Holland-Batt, and author Paddy O’Reilly. An entry fee of $20 (or $15 for ABR subscribers) is payable.

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Cells for Writers - Old Melbourne Gaol - credit Duncan Chen

If having a distraction-free place to write has been that one thing stopping you from completing your manuscript, then this unique writers’ residency program might just be the answer. Since May 2012 Writers Victoria, in partnership with the National Trust of Australia, has offered writers the opportunity to work in the historic Old Melbourne Gaol.

Melbourne Gaol opened in 1842 and has played an important part in Australia’s history. Until its closure in 1929 it held some of the country’s most notorious criminals, including bushranger Ned Kelly who was hanged there for murder in 1880. Today, night-time ghost tours of the gaol are a popular tourist attraction.

Writers Victoria’s Cells for Writers program offers two spaces in unrenovated former double cells, located on the top floor of the gaol building. Each cell is furnished with just a desk and a chair. Since the program started two years ago, thirty writers have participated each staying a month or more.

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The Long Route: A Manifesto for the Late-Blooming Writer

 A guest post by Sam Ryan

Patience, they say, is a virtue. For writers it’s a way of life. Ideas, inspiration and the right words can’t be forced, just facilitated. Sometimes the same goes for your writing career.

Some of us take a little longer than we’d like, going through our 20s, maybe 30s and beyond, unsure just what it is we want to do with our love of words, including whether or not to actually turn it from  a hobby into a money-earner.

Some of us take the long route, with inevitable detours; maybe doing a couple of degrees and hopping around the many jobs that involve words before figuring it out. That’s ok – indeed, it’s necessary.

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