Archives For Arts

‘It’s hot in Melbourne and not just because of the temperature. Neil F*cking Gaiman is here.’ And so begins this one-hour long interview by Melbourne broadcaster Alicia Sometimes.

Gaiman and his wife Amanda Palmer are regular visitors to Australia where they both have a large and loyal fan base – late last year they announced on Twitter that they’d be making a  surprise appearance at a city public library and over 400 people turned up.

In this hour long interview Gaiman gives a preview of his forthcoming novel, The Ocean at the End of the Lane, and reads the book’s fifth chapter which he describes as ‘the shortest and nastiest chapter’ he has ever written.

He also discusses Dr Who, screenwriting, social media, Sandman and more. The session ends with Gaiman reading a poem he wrote for Australia Day.

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The Privileges by Jonathan Dee 2011 winner of the St Frances PrizeEntries are now open for the St. Francis College Literary Prize for 2013. This biennial prize awards US$50,000 to an author for their 3rd to 5th published work of fiction.

There are no citizenship restrictions with this prize and eligible authors can be based anywhere in the world. Nominated books can also be published anywhere in the world, although only English-language books may be entered (translations accepted). Uniquely, self-published books are also eligible for consideration.

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Once Upon a Time
In 2012 Pixar Story Artist Emma Coats tweeted 22 storytelling tips using the hashtag #storybasics. The list circulated the internet for months gaining the popular title Pixar’s 22 Rules of Storytelling. We reposted this list two weeks ago and the response has been phenomenal with thousands of likes, shares, comments and emails.

Since posting the story, a number of people have contacted us regarding rule number 4 on the list, also know as ‘The Story Spine':

Once upon a time there was ___. Every day, ___. One day ___. Because of that, ___. Because of that, ___. Until finally ___.

Reports were that this tip did not originate with Pixar but instead with writer/director/teacher Brian McDonald. Intrigued, we contacted Brian to find out more. He replied as follows:

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Friday Aerogramme: News and Updates from Aerogramme Writers' Studio

Just over a week ago we posted Pixar’s 22 Rules of Storytelling - a list first shared by Emma Coats, a Pixar Story Artist, on Twitter in 2012. To say the response to the post has been huge would be an understatement. We’ve received thousands of comments and shares and the interest in the list continues to grow. On Wednesday The New Yorker’s Richard Brody responded to the story with an article titled The Problem with Processed Storytelling’. Brody says that Pixar films make him feel as if he ‘were watching the cinematic equivalent of irresistibly processed food, with a ramped-up and carefully calibrated dosing of the emotional versions of salt, sugar, and fat.’ What do you think of Brody’s article? Add your thoughts in the comments below.

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Joss Whedon Top 10 Writing Tips

Film critic Catherine Bray interviewed Joss Whedon in 2006 for UK movie magazine Hotdog to find out his top ten screenwriting tips. Catherine has kindly given us permission to reproduce the article here. Photo: Joss Whedon at San Diego Comic Con – courtesy of Gage Skidmore.

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Pixar's 22 Rules of Storytelling
These rules were originally tweeted by Emma Coats, Pixar’s Story Artist. Number 9 on the list – When you’re stuck, make a list of what wouldn’t happen next – is a great one and can apply to writers in all genres.

  1. You admire a character for trying more than for their successes. Continue Reading…