Archives For News

Penn State University Writing Residency

Pennsylvania State University‘s Altoona Campus English Program is taking applications for a one-semester teaching residency in fiction and creative nonfiction. The program is targeted at early career writers, preferably without a published book.

The residency is designed to offer an emerging writer substantial time to write and offers a salary of $10,000 in return for teaching one general education level introduction to creative writing workshop during the Fall 2015 semester (24 August to 18 December).

The resident writer will also give a public reading, visit other creative writing courses and work informally with English major students. The hiring committee is looking for a writer with publications of fiction and creative nonfiction in literary magazines. The successful candidate typically lives in the Altoona area during the residency; benefits and housing are not included.

A Master’s degree in Creative Writing or English is required; an MFA or PhD in Creative Writing is preferred. Teaching experience is also preferred. Review of applications will begin on 1 April 1 2015 and will continue until the position is filled.

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Friday Aerogramme 24 October 2014

Friday 24 October 2014

  1. Momentum Books seeking to hire a book blogger. The blogger will write between 4 and 8 posts per month on topics related to reading, writing, books and storytelling culture (paid position).
  2. Helen Garner’s Monkey Grip, an extraordinary documentary that uncovers the real events behind Garner’s groundbreaking debut novel, is available to stream on ABC iView until next Thursday (geoblocked, Australia only).
  3. The New Yorker has published a new short story by Oscar-winning actor Tom Hanks. Listen to Hanks read ‘Alan Bean Plus Four’ on Soundcloud.
  4. The Wrong Quarterly is a new London-based literary magazine showcasing prose from British and international writers. It is accepting submissions of fiction, non-fiction, life-writing and essays. The Wrong Quarterly is also seeking experienced readers and copyeditors.
  5. Small Press Network has announced the shortlist for the Most Underrated Book Award 2014. The award aims to shine a light on some of the outstanding titles that are released by small and independent Australian publishers that, for whatever reason, did not receive their fair dues when first released.
  6. The Ministry of Stories, a creative writing and mentoring centre for young people in east London, is advertising a number of positions including Creative Learning Manager and Community Engagement Coordinator.
  7. Vogue has posted an exclusive preview of a new documentary about the life on Joan Didion. The film is being made by her nephew, Griffin Dunne, the longtime actor and filmmaker, together with the documentarian Susanne Rostock.
  8. Entries for the Horatio Nelson Fiction Prize for Unpublished Manuscripts close next Friday. The winner will receive $5000 and publication through Black Balloon.
  9. Have you ever dreamed of being locked in a bookshop at night? If you have, check out this competition Waterstones and AirBnB are running in London.
  10. After a few months break, Aerogramme Writers’ Studio is back on Tumblr. Say hello at aerogrammestudio.tumblr.com.

For book news, writing competition updates, publication opportunities and more follow Aerogramme Writers’ Studio on Facebook and Twitter.

Title image by Ron Reiring via Creative Commons

Granta is Accepting Unsolicited Submissions

After a long hiatus Granta, one of the world’s most prestigious literary magazines, is again accepting unsolicited submissions.

Granta’s history can be traced back to 1889 when a student politics and literature magazine called The Granta was founded at Cambridge University. Since its relaunch 35 years ago, Granta has been a quarterly literary journal, with the aim of publishing the best new writing.

Granta publishes fiction, non-fiction and poetry. There are no strict word limits, though most prose submissions are between 3000 and 6000 words and the editors advise they are unlikely to read more than 10,000 words of any submission.

Alongside the print edition, the online New Writing program publishes stories, poems, essays, interviews, animations and more from established Granta alumni as well as new voices.

All submissions will be considered for both the print and online editions (unless otherwise stipulated in the cover letter). Selection is extremely competitive and only a very small fraction of submissions will be chosen for publication. Reading recent editions of Granta will help you assess whether your work is likely to be a good match.

Writers must submit their work via Submittable and there are no reading fees. For further information visit the Granta website. Submissions are scheduled to remain open until 1 April 2015.

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Friday Aerogramme

Friday 17 October 2014

  1. The big news in books this week was of course that Australia’s Richard Flanagan won the Man Booker Prize 2014 for his novel The Narrow Road to the Deep North. In his acceptance speech he said:
    I do not share the pessimism of the age about the novel. They are one of our greatest spiritual, aesthetic and intellectual inventions. As a species it is story that distinguishes us, and one of the supreme expressions of story is the novel. Novels are not content. Nor are they are a mirror to life or an explanation of life or a guide to life.Novels are life, or they are nothing.
    Read the full speech here.
  2. In other awards news, the finalists for the National Book Awards 2014 have been announced. The fiction list features Rabih Alameddine, Anthony Doerr, Phil Klay, Emily St. John Mandel and Marilynne Robinson. According to Matthew Specktor ‘Doerr should win, but Robinson will’.
  3. On Wednesday we posted our Opportunities for Writers post for November and December. It has over 100 competitions, fellowships and publication opportunities for writers at all stages of their careers.
  4. McSweeney’s Publishing has announced that it will begin operating as nonprofit. The move aims to ensure the long-term future of McSweeney’s, with the help of an expanded community of donors, writers, and readers.
  5. NaNoWriMo starts in just over two weeks. Literary agent Nephele Tempest has some helpful advice for anyone planning to undertake the herculean task of writing a novel in a single month.
  6. Australian Book Review’s $5000 Calibre Prize for an Outstanding Essay is now open for entries; writers from around the world are eligible to submit their work.
  7. Seven Stories, the national centre for children’s books in the United Kingdom, has created a list of the 50 best books for cultural diversity. The list aims to promote books that explore diversity, either in terms of its story or the ethnic and cultural origins of the author or illustrator.
  8. Harvard Professor Elisa New is teaching a free, open online course on American Poetry (1700 – 1850). The course starts next Wednesday and runs for seven weeks.
  9. Each week the So You Want to be a Writer podcast shares news and advice from the writing and blogging worlds. The latest episode discusses the reason why some blogs succeed, taking criticism and the best places to do an interview.
  10. Ninth Letter is accepting submissions until 1 November for a special online edition featuring the work of creative writing students. Undergraduate and graduate students may submit up to three poems, or one piece of short prose (fiction and non-fiction) of up to 3500 words.

For book news, writing competition updates, publication opportunities and more follow Aerogramme Writers’ Studio on Facebook and Twitter.

richard flanagan

Opportunities for Writers November and December 2014

Over 100 competitions, publication opportunities, fellowships and more.

Please check the relevant websites for all terms and conditions and be aware that entry fees are payable in many cases. 

NaNoWriMo
November is National Novel Writing Month, or NaNoWriMo, described as ‘the world’s largest writing event and nonprofit literary crusade’. Participants pledge to write 50,000 words in a month, starting from scratch and reaching ‘The End’ by November 30. The NaNoWriMo website offers lots of tips and support, as well as links to local events around the globe.

John Steinbeck Short Story Award
is one of three prizes offered by Reed Magazine. This award is for a work of fiction up to 5000 words and requires a reading fee of $15. The winner of the John Steinbeck Award receives a cash prize of US$1000. Entries close 1 November.

Gabriele Rico Creative Nonfiction Challenge
also offered by Reed Magazine, is for a work of nonfiction up to 5000 words. The winner receives a cash prize of US$1333. Entries close 1 November.

Edwin Markham Prize
is the third prize from Reed Magazine. It is for is for works of poetry and is awarded for up to five poems. The winner receives US$1000.  Entries close 1 November.

Amazon.ca First Novel Award
is a competition that recognises the outstanding achievement of a first-time Canadian novelist.The Award is for books published in English in between 1 January 2014 and 31 March 2015. Finalists receive $1000 each and the winner receives $7500. Entries for books published in 2014 close on 1 November.

Malahat Review’s Open Season Awards
are open to short fiction up to 2500 words, as well as to poetry and creative non-fiction. The winning entries receive CA$1000 and will be published in The Malahat Review’s Spring 2015 issue. Entries close 1 November.

Bat City Review
is an annual literary magazine run by graduate students from the University of Texas at Austin. It interested in poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction (personal essays, memoir, commentary) that experiments with language, form, and unconventional subject matter, as well as more traditional work. Submissions close 1 November. Continue Reading…

Man Booker Prize 2014 - Richard Flanagan and Neel Mukherjee

The winner of the 2014 Man Booker Prize will be announced in London next Tuesday. This was the first year that books by writers from all nations have been permitted to enter the prestigious award, leading to speculation that the field would be dominated by American authors. Instead, it looks unlikely that the prize will be awarded outside the Commonwealth. If the latest odds from bookmaker William Hill are accurate, either Australia’s Richard Flanagan or Calcutta-born Neel Mukherjee will be taking home the £50,000 prize.

When the thirteen book longlist was announced in July, Mukherjee’s The Lives of Others immediately become a hot favourite among commentators and bookmakers alike. David Mitchell’s The Bone Clocks was also popular among many pundits but the English authors’ sixth novel failed to make the shortlist. Flanagan’s The Narrow Road To The Deep North has been top seller is his home country but the book missed out on the Miles Franklin Award, the country’s most prestigious literary prize.

The Man Booker Prize 2014 Bookmakers’ Odds

A total of 154 books were considered by the Man Booker Prize judges this year, 145 of which were submitted by publishers with a further 9 called in by the judges. William Hill’s odds for the six novels still in contention are:

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Horation Nelson Fiction Prize 2014

The Horatio Nelson Fiction Prize is awarded each year by Black Balloon Publishing. The winner of the 2014 prize will receive US$5000 and a publishing deal with Black Balloon.

The prize is for a completed, unpublished, original fiction manuscript over 50,000 words. Writers can be from any country and there are no citizenship restrictions. Both novels and short story collections may be entered.

The 2013 Horatio Nelson Fiction Prize was won by Iowan author Mike Meginnis. His novel Fat Man Little Boy was published in this month.

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