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Competitions for Writers in February and March 2015

Competitions from around the world for both established and emerging writers.

Please check the relevant websites for all terms and conditions and be aware that entry fees are payable in many cases. 

Homestart Bridgwater Short Story Prize
is being run in aid of an independent registered charity offering support to families facing difficulties The prize is open to stories up to 2200 words and will be judged by Tracy Chevalier, best known for the international best-seller Girl with a Pearl Earring. Entries close 1 February.

Malahat Review Long Poem Prize
is open to writers from all countries. Entries must consist of either single poem or cycle of poems between 10 to 20 pages long. Two prizes of CA$1000 will be awarded. Entries close 1 February.

Sycamore Review’s Flashcard Flash Fiction Contest
is for pieces up to 500 words. First prize is US$100, publication online, and publication on a Flashcard that will be distributed with Sycamore Review. Entries close 1 February.

Myriad’s First Drafts Competition
is open to all writers who have not yet published or self-published a collection of stories or a novel. Submissions should comprise a one-page synopsis and up to 5000 words of a work-in-progress (novel or short story collection). The prize is a week-long writing retreat at West Dean College near Chichester, detailed editorial feedback from industry experts plus six months’ mentoring from a Myriad author. Entries close 2 February.

SLS-Disquiet Literary Contest
is sponsored by Guernica, Fence Magazine, Ninth Letter, and the esteemed Graywolf Press. The winners receive tuition, airfares, and accommodations for  the Disquiet International Literary Program in Lisbon, Portugal. Entries close 10 February.

Griffith University’s Josephine Ulrick Literature Prize
is one of Australia’s richest short stories prizes. First prize is AUD$10,000 and second prize is $5000. Stories may be up to 2000 words. Griffith University also offers a poetry prize with equal prize money. Entrants must be Australian citizens or residents and entries close 13 February.
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Brown Foundation Fellows Program in France: Applications Close 15 February

The Brown Foundation Fellows Program is offered by The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. It offers residencies to mid-career professionals in the arts and humanities, including writers. The residencies last between one and three months and take place at The Dora Maar House in Ménerbes, France.

The Dora Maar House
The property was purchased in 1944 by Pablo Picasso for Dora Maar, his companion and muse. It is located in the beautiful walled village of Ménerbes in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur region of south-eastern France. The population is approximately 1,100. Many readers may be familiar with Ménerbes through the work of British writer Peter Mayle. Mayle’s autobiographical A Year in Provence documents his move to a 200-year-old stone farmhouse in the village.

Facilities at the Dora Maar House include four private bedrooms with ensuites, and three studies for writers and scholars. There is a large communal kitchen, living space, dining room and library, as well as two garden areas. Wi-fi access is available, as is a printer. The Dora Maar House is a non-smoking environment.

Who Can Apply
The Brown Foundation Fellows Program is open to writers, scholars and other artists. Candidates are expected to have an established career in their field, with the fellowship providing them with time to concentrate on their area of expertise. Continue Reading…

Publication Opportunities for Writers: February and March 2015

Over 60 publication opportunities for both established and emerging writers.

Please check the relevant websites for all terms and conditions. 

Londonist
is seeking stories by children and stories for children. Submissions should be strongly linked to London (either set in London or heavily inspired by the city) and can have any theme (like sci-fi or historical) or none at all. There are no strict guidelines on story length; entries might be only a few sentences or could be as long as 1500 words.

CutBank
is a literary magazine founded in 1973 by the creative writing program at the University of Montana. It publishes two issues per year featuring  fiction, poetry and literary non-fiction by established writers and new voices alike. Submissions close on 1 February.

Overland
is seeking fiction from new and emerging writers for a special online edition to be curated by Khalid Warsame. For this special edition, ‘new and emerging’ describes a writer who has not yet published a book of stories or novel with commercial distribution. Closes 1 February.

Bellevue Literary Review
is seeking submissions of previously unpublished fiction, nonfiction, and poetry for an upcoming special issue on war and military experience. Submission close on 1 February.

Berkeley Poetry Review
is accepting submissions for its 45th issue. The editors have a particular interested in work that complicates prevailing conceptions of race, gender, sexuality, ecology, and poetic form itself. The deadline is 1 February.

Lunch Ticket
is a biannual journal published by the MFA community of Antioch University of Los Angeles. Submissions of fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, writing for young people and visual art for its Summer/Fall 2015 issue open on 1 February.

Southampton Review
is dedicated to “discovering new voices and visions while savoring long-standing favorites”. Some of the established writers it has published include Billy Collins, Meg Wolitzer, Frank McCourt and David Rakoff. Submissions reopen on 1 February.

Buffalo Almanack
is an online quarterly journal of fiction, photography and literary criticism. It welcomes submissions for new and established writers. New issues are released quarterly and submissions reopen on 1 February. Continue Reading…

Submissions Are Now Open for BBC Radio 4's Opening Lines Series

Opening Lines is BBC Radio 4’s annual new writing series. It gives new and emerging short story writers the opportunity to have their work read on radio for the first time. Submissions are now open for the 2015 series.

Three successful writers will have their stories broadcast on BBC Radio 4 and be invited to the BBC in London to see their stories being recorded. In addition, the BBC will publish transcripts of the best stories on the Opening Lines website.

To ensure your story is read and doesn’t miss out on this opportunity, the following criteria must be met:

  • Writers who have previously had a story/stories broadcast on network radio or have substantial writing credits in other areas of radio (e.g. comedy and drama) are not eligible for this series.
  • Only one story per writer will be accepted.
  • Do not submit stories that have previously been considered for Opening Lines.
  • Stories must be between 1900 and 2000 words in length (the time allotted for each story is up to 14 minutes).

Opening Lines is open to all writers regardless of nationality or residence but all stories must be submitted in English.

The produces advise that they are looking for original short stories which work being read out loud i.e. with a strong emphasis on narrative and avoiding too much dialogue, character description and digression. It is recommended that writers pay particular attention to how the story opens and closes as they will be looking to see whether the beginning of a story successfully links to how it ends. While they are interested in seeing stories which cover a broad range of subject-matter, material which explores particularly dark, harrowing themes is not best suited to Opening Lines.

Transcripts of the stories selected for Opening Lines in 2013 and 2014 can be found here.

For more general advice on getting a short story commissioned for radio, read this article from Paul McVeigh, Director of the London Short Story Festival.

Stories will be accepted until Friday 13 February. The submission form can be downloaded here and further information is available on the Opening Lines website.

 

Image by Monogatari via Creative Commons


Publication Opportunities for Writers in January and February 2015

Over 50 publication opportunities for both established and emerging writers.

Please check the relevant websites for all terms and conditions. 

Printer’s Devil Review
is seeking thoughtful, earnest fiction. The editors like stories that ‘make the ordinary unfamiliar, that introduce us to new ways of seeing and being in the world, stories that move us without aiming for stock reactions’. The current reading period is open until 1 January.

Apogee
is a literary journal specialising in literature and art that engage with issues of identity politics: race, gender, sexuality, class, ability, and hyphenated identities. Submissions for Issue 5 close on 1 January.

Firewords Quarterly
is a new independent literary magazine with a strong emphasis on design, as well as substance. Launched in Spring 2014, Firewords aims to be a publication where exciting new writers can have their voices heard and remembered. Submissions for Issue 4 are open until 9 January.

Slice Magazine
welcomes submissions for short fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. The editors are looking for anyone with a fresh voice and a compelling story to share. Submissions are open throughout January and February.

Blank Fiction Magazine
an independent literary magazine publishing intelligent and thought-provoking genre fiction. It is currently seeking submissions of literary fiction up to 10,000 words. Closes 10 January.

Litro Magazine
is seeking submissions for its February 2015 print issue with the theme ‘Diaries’. It accepts short fiction, flash/micro fiction and non-fiction. Submissions close 11 January.

Lifted Brow
is accepting submissions of fiction and non-fiction for its soon to be relaunched print edition; closes 11 January. Entries are also being accepted for its inaugural experimental non-fiction prize.
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Competitions for Writers in January and February 2015

Competitions from around the world for both established and emerging writers.

Please check the relevant websites for all terms and conditions and be aware that entry fees are payable in many cases. 

Glass Mountain Poetry & Prose Contest
is open to emerging writers; current or former students in any graduate program in creative writing are not eligible to submit. Winners in each category will receive US$100, publication in Glass Mountain, and free registration to the 2015 Boldface Conference. Entries close 9 January.

Folio Fiction Contest
is seeking entries up to 5000 words on the theme ‘conflict’. Entries should address how the operation of the theme at the macro level (Climate Change, Racial Injustice, Abductions, Armed conflicts, Surveillance, Consumption, Global Warming, Violence Against Women) interacts with characters, scenes, and events at the intimate, micro level. First prize is US$1000 and entries close 15 January.

Patricia Goedicke Prize in Poetry
accepts entries of up to five poems. The winner, chosen by Matt Rasmussen, will be featured in CutBank 83 and receive $500. All submissions will be considered for print publication. Closes 15 January.

H.E. Francis Short Story Competition
is open to original, unpublished fiction of 5000 words or less. The winner receives a $2000 cash prize,  publication as an Amazon Kindle Single, an announcement in Poets and Writers, and, with the author’s permission, publication on the H.E. Francis Competition Website. Entries close 15 January.

Montana Prize in Fiction
seeks to highlight work that showcases “an authentic voice, a boldness of form, and a rejection of functional fixedness”. The winner, chosen by Susan Steinberg, will be featured in CutBank 83 and receive US$500. All submissions will be considered for print publication. Entries close 15 January.
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Iceland Writers Retreat is offering one lucky writer a free delegate’s ticket to its April 2015 event.

The winner will receive a full retreat package including accommodation, tours, most meals and all workshops for the duration of the retreat which runs from 8 to 12 April.

To enter, contestants are asked to write a short story or essay of no more than 500 words using the above image of Harpa Concert Hall and Conference Center as their inspiration.

The prize does not include flights to Iceland or transfers. Only one entry person is permitted and there is no entry fee. The panel of four judges will be made up of representatives from Iceland Travel, Reykjavík UNESCO City of Literature, Promote Iceland, and Iceland Review magazine.

Entries close at midnight on Sunday 25 January. For full entry information visit icelandwritersretreat.tumblr.com.

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