Earlier this week entries to the lucrative Montreal International Poetry Prize opened for 2017. The winner of the prize will receive a cash prize of CA $20,000 (approximately US $15,200). Montreal International Poetry Prize is open to original, unpublished poems up to 40 lines long. Entrants can be from anywhere in the world and do not need to be previously published poets.

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A post by Julian Bass, Lecturer in Software Engineering at the University of Salford

If you want to be a better, faster writer, you should treat your writing as a lean manufacturing process. “Lean” is an engineering technique for making manufacturing less wasteful and has been used in industrial production for decades. Today it has spread to sectors from software development to customer services. But I’ve found the principles of lean can even help improve the practice of writing, whether you’re producing a report or a novel.

Lean was developed from Japanese manufacturing ideas in the 1980s and 1990s. It involves applying five principles to minimise waste and increase productivity: flow, value, waste, pull and perfection. The key goals in lean manufacturing are to learn and continually improve. For writing, we have to first start with a finished piece of work in order to get feedback. Then we can start to apply the circular lean process and principles.

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Entries are now open for the St. Francis College Literary Prize for 2017. This biennial prize awards US$50,000 to an author for their 3rd to 5th published work of fiction.

Eligible authors can be based anywhere in the world and there are no age or citizenship restrictions. Nominated books can also be published anywhere in the world, although only English-language books may be entered (translations accepted). Uniquely, self-published books are also eligible for consideration.

In order to be eligible for the 2017 prize, the nominated work needs to have been published between June 2015 and May 2017. 

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Welcome to our first opportunities round up for 2017. For readers who are new to our site, each month we aim to provide a helpful round-up of writing competitions, fellowships, publication opportunities and more for writers at all stages of their careers.

Deadlines and details do sometimes change, so please check the relevant websites (linked in bold) for all the latest details. For more opportunities and regular updates follow Aerogramme Writers’ Studio on Facebook and Twitter.

Firewords Quarterly
is an independent literary magazine with a strong emphasis on design, as well as substance. Firewords aims to be a publication where exciting new writers can have their voices heard and remembered. Submissions for issue 10 open on 10 January.

The Orwell Prize
is Britain’s most prestigious prize for political writing. Entries are accepted in three categories: books, journalism and ‘exposing Britain’s social evils’. Closes 12 January.

Mogford Short Story Prize
is for work with food and drink at its heart. First prize is £10,000 (US$12,500) and stories may be up to 2500 words. Entries close on 15 January.

River River
is a new literary journal from the heart of the Hudson Valley, in New York, USA. It features new poetry, short prose, photography and translations twice a year. Submissions for the Spring 2017 issue are open until 15 January.

Masters Review’s Short Story Award For New Writers
offers a first prize of $2000 plus online publication and review of your work by three literary agents. It is only open to writers who have not published a book and submissions may be up to 7000 words. Entries close 15 January.

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Would you like two months in bustling Shanghai to polish on your manuscript? Or perhaps a working cattle ranch in rural Wyoming would provide you with the inspiration you need to start a new project? These residencies provide writers with a chance to escape daily life’s distractions and focus on their work. Each residency has its own terms and conditions, so please read the relevant websites (linked to in bold) thoroughly before commencing any applications.

 

Baltic Writing Residency
The writer chosen for the Baltic Writing Residency in Sweden receives $1000, and a free stay in a furnished cottage in Stockholm. The residency is open to writers of fiction, creative non-fiction, plays and poetry. Applications close on 15 January.

Historic Joy Kogawa House
Located in British Columbia, Canada, this residency is available to Canadian writers who have published two books and have previous teaching and public speaking experience. Residency last for three months and successful candidates receive a stipend of $2500 per month. Applications close on 1 February.

Philip Roth Residence in Creative Writing
This residency is hosted by Bucknell University in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania. Named for the University’s renowned literary alumnus and initiated in the fall of 1993, the Philip Roth Residence in Creative Writing offers up to four months of unfettered writing time for a writer working on a first or second book. The program provides lodging in Poets’ Cottage and a stipend of US$5000. Applications close on 1 February.

Charles Perkins Centre Writer in Residence Fellowship
This fellowship supports an established Australian writer to create new work within Australia’s leading interdisciplinary centre dedicated to easing the global burden of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and related conditions through innovative research and teaching. The fellowship runs for one year and includes a grant of AUD$100,000, an Honorary Appointment at the University of Sydney and a base in the Charles Perkins Centre Research and Education Hub. Applications close 10 February.

American Library in Paris Visiting Fellowship
Founded in 1920, the American Library is Paris is a private, non-profit English-language library. Its fellowship program is open to writers worldwide. Fellows receive a stipend of US$5000 to assist with travel and housing costs. Applications close 14 February.

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The American Library in Paris is a private, non-profit English-language library located in the 7th arrondissement. It was founded in 1920 by the American Library Association using cases of books sent to U.S. soldiers serving in France during World War I. Among the first trustees of the Library was the expatriate American author Edith Wharton, and Ernest Hemingway and Gertrude Stein were both early patrons.

First awarded in 2013, the Library’s Visiting Fellowship offer writers the opportunity to work in Paris for a month or longer, while participating actively in the life of the American Library. Writers should be working on a book project, either fiction or non-fiction, which resonates with the Library’s Franco-American tradition and interests. As part of the fellowship, the library will connect the visiting writer to resources and people in Paris that could be helpful to his or her project.

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Submit with abandon? Send out a story that’s already received 20 rejections? Keep going? Call it quits? Should you send an edited piece to a magazine that passed on an older draft? Kim Winternheimer, founding editor of The Masters Review, talks submission strategies.

Submission strategies are a tricky thing. Every emerging writer I know discusses submission failures and victories, and it’s a topic that pops up in conference panels and workshop often.

Writers talk about submitting because the process itself is the road to publication. Because success in selling stories rests entirely on that effort. Writers lament and analyze the form rejection they receive after eight long months, and applaud the personalized request for more work. Writers talk about the process because they want to see how others are navigating the labyrinth, and, because silently they wonder: am I tackling submissions the right way?

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