Rattle Poetry Prize 2016

Rattle’s 11th annual poetry prize is currently accepting entries. The winner will receive US$10,000 and publication in the winter issue of the magazine. Ten finalists will each receive $200 and be in the running for a $2000 Reader’s Choice Award.

The competition is open to writers worldwide and all entries must be previously unpublished. Poems may be any length, any style, or any subject and there is no line limit.

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A woman reads a tablet beside a fire pit on cold winter evening outside the Science Center at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts February 18, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT) - RTR4Q65X

Young adult literature is booming – and the secret is in the communities of young book lovers forming online. Photo: Brian Snyder

A post by Marcella Purnama and Mark Davis, University of Melbourne

Before JK Rowling, critics and experts predicted that young adult (YA) literature would finally die, as sales continued to decline. In 1997, a mere 3,000 YA books were published. A decade later that number was 30,000.

The success of Harry Potter changed everything. YA is now embraced by teenagers and adults alike – a 2012 Bowker Market Research study in the US found that 55 per cent of people buying YA books are over 18.

We’re currently living in the second golden age of YA literature. But why is there a sudden demand for these coming-of-age books?

Apart from the undeniable quality of the books themselves, a generation of online readers are creating new ways to discuss, dissect and celebrate their favourite stories. And it’s driving sales in a big way.

Take John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars (2012). It reached #1 on the Amazon and Barnes & Noble bestseller lists six months before the book was published. It received thousands of five-star reviews, ranked by readers who hadn’t even held their copies.

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The University of East Anglia’s School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing is offering a free, online course focused on screenwriting.

Starting on Monday 2 May, this course is for anyone new to scriptwriting and for more experienced writers who wish to raise their scriptwriting to a professional level: “It will establish a common vocabulary for approaching the screenplay and form the basis for upcoming courses in dramatic adaptation, the crime screenplay, and other genres and skills.”

The course is led by Michael Lengsfield. A graduate of Columbia University’s MFA program, Michael has written scripts for The Walt Disney Company, Harpo Entertainment and others, and his work has screened at the Sundance Film Festival.

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Opportunities for Writers May and June 2016

Each month we aim to provide a helpful round-up of writing competitions, fellowships, publication opportunities and more for writers at all stages of their careers. 

For new writers, or for anyone seeking a refresher, we highly recommend reading How to Submit Your Writing to Literary Magazines.

Deadlines and details do sometimes change, so please check the relevant websites (linked in bold) for all the latest details. For more opportunities and regular updates follow Aerogramme Writers’ Studio on Facebook and Twitter.

The O. Henry Prize Stories
is an annual collection of the year’s twenty best stories published in American and Canadian magazines. Entries must be submitted by the magazine’s editors and should reach the series editor, Laura Furman, by 1 May. The 20 stories selected for the 2015 O. Henry Prize collection are available here.

Malahat Review’s Far Horizons Poetry Award
is currently accepting poetry from emerging writers worldwide. No more than 3 poems per submission (multiple submissions welcome). Entry fee comes with one-year subscription. A prize of $1000 will be awarded to one winner. The deadline is 1 May.

Prairie Schooner
was established in 1926. Its intention is to publish the best writing available, both from beginning and established writers. Submissions close 1 May.

10 Days to a Daily Habit
is a new Skillshare course taught by  novelist, essayist and bookseller Emily Gould. This self-paced creative writing challenge is aimed at helping you unlock your creativity and kickstart a daily writing habit. Enrol using the link above to access this course, and hundreds of others, for three months for just 99 cents.

David Nathan Meyerson Prize for Fiction
is only open to writers who have not yet published a book of fiction, either a novel or collection of stories. The winner receives US$1000 and publication in Southwest Review. Stories can be up to 8000 words in length and all entries will be considered for publication. The deadline for entries is 1 May.

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Emily Gould

Emily Gould is a novelist, essayist and bookseller. Based in New York City, she is the co-owner of independent e-bookstore Emily Books and a former co-editor at Gawker.com.

Emily has launched a new online, self-paced Skillshare class that features a 10-day creative writing challenge aimed at helping you unlock your creativity and kickstart a daily writing habit.

Enrolment is the class is FREE for a limited time via this link. The offer expires at 11.59pm on Tuesday 12 April, American Eastern Standard Time.

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A post by By Kenechi Uzor

The philosopher Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900) is considered to be one of the greatest minds that ever lived. He was so revered during his life time that a student wrote to a friend after spotting Nietzsche on a train: “I just saw god on the 5 o’clock train.”

Along with the Bible, Nietzsche’s book, Thus Spoke Zarathustra (free eBook) was a standard issue for all German soldiers during World War 1.

Friedrich Nietzsche thought and wrote on practically everything. His ten rules of writing were written in letters to his unrequited love, Lou Andreas-Salomé.

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Fellowship and Mentorship Programs for Screenwriters in 2016

Please check the relevant websites for full entry terms and conditions.

Film Independent’s Screenwriting Lab
is an intensive four-week program that runs two to three evenings a week in Los Angeles every Autumn. It is designed to help screenwriters develop and express their unique voices as writers and to take their current scripts to the next level. Lab Fellows connect with various established screenwriters and explicate their films, learn about their careers, and discuss the writing process. The fellowship includes a $10,000 cash grant as well as inclusion in the Screenwriting Lab.. Non-member applications close on 18 April or Film Independent members have until 2 May to apply.

Academy Nicholl Fellowships in Screenwriting
awards up to five fellowships of US$35,000 each year. This international screenwriting competition is open to writers based anywhere in the world, regardless of citizenship. All entrants must be aged over 18.The final entry deadline is 2 May.

CBS Diversity Institute’s Writers Mentoring Program
aims is to provide access and opportunities for talented and motivated diverse writers. The program is held in Los Angeles but writers do not need to be American residents to apply (there are no travel grants or subsidies though). Applications close 2 May.

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