New Orleans Review is Accepting Work for a Special Science Fiction Issue

New Orleans Review is currently accepting work for a special science fiction issue to be published in spring 2015. The editors are looking for science or speculative fiction in any genre, including short stories, flash fiction, image/text collisions, creative nonfiction, and poetry.

Prose submissions should be no longer than 7500 words. Poetry submissions should be no more than five pages (if you are working in long-form or series, you may send up to fifteen pages of poetry). All work must be previously unpublished but simultaneous submissions are accepted. All contributors will receive two complimentary copies of the issue.

Submissions close on 31 December 2014. For full details see New Orleans Review’s submissions page.

New Orleans Review is also considering work for its web features series. Fiction and nonfiction may be up to 2500 words and poetry can be up to five pages. Book reviews and interviews are also being accepted; see NOR’s website for full details.

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By Zoë Sadokierski
Lecturer, School of Design at University of Technology, Sydney

How publishing works: a book designer's perspective - Image by Zoe Sadokierski

Publishing is the process of getting the author’s story out of her or his head and into the hands of a reader. Zoe Sadokierski

Authors don’t write books, they write manuscripts. Publishing is the process of getting an author’s manuscript into the hands of a reader, by materialising it – giving it form, as a book. This may be printed (a codex) or digital (an ebook).

I produced the illustrations in this post for a Sydney Writers Festival talk in 2012. All publishing houses have different protocols and cultures; this overview is based on my experience as an in-house book designer at Allen&Unwin (2003-2006), and as a freelance designer for a range of Australian publishers over the past decade.

How publishing works a book designers perspective - Image 2 - Zoe Sadokierski

The author enters a publishing house with a manuscript. Zoe Sadokierski

The author’s manuscript is either solicited (the publisher asks them to write it) or unsolicited (the author writes it, then shops for a publisher). Being rejected is awful and publishing contracts are complicated, so many authors employ an agent to negotiate a deal with a publisher.

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Cove Park is a Scottish artists’ retreat located on the Rosneath peninsula, an hour’s drive west of Glasgow. In 2015 Cove Park is offering a minimum of three literature residencies. The residencies are open to writers around the world.

Cove Park was founded in 1999 by Peter and Eileen Jacobs. The centre’s residencies “respond to the diversity of contemporary artistic practice in all the art forms, whether performing or visual arts, crafts, literature or music. [Its] interdisciplinary programmes, for both individuals and collaborating groups, offer time, space and freedom to make new work and to find new ways of working.”

Cove Park’s distinguished alumni include Margaret Atwood, Anne Carson, Brian Chikwava, Helen Cross, Rachel Cusk, Fred D’Aguiar, Joe Dunthorne, Jennie Erdal, Rodge Glass, John Glenday, Jen Hadfield, Jack Mapanje, Michael Pedersen, Jo Shapcott, Zoe Strachan, Chiew-Siah Tei, Kate Tough, Christos Tsiolkas, Chika Unigwe, Louise Welsh and Nicola White.

The 2015 literature residencies will take place between March and September and last for between one and three months. Applications are invited from established writers of short and long fiction; poetry; creative non-fiction and memoir; work that crosses these genres and also writers who have made their reputation in one field and wish to develop in another. To be eligible for consideration, writers must have published at least one full-length book in their field.

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Friday Aerogramme: 10 Links for Writers & Readers (7 November 2014)

Friday 7 November 2014

  1. The nominees for the 2014 Goodreads Choice Awards were announced this week. There are 15 nominees in each of the 20 categories ranging from fiction to fantasy to young adult fiction to food & cookbooks. The first round of voting closes tomorrow and the semi-finals run until 15 November.
  2. Rolling Stone has published an exclusive excerpt from Stephen King’s forthcoming novel, Revival. This ‘modern-day Frankenstein story’ is out on 11 November.
  3. Former New York Times Executive Editor Jill Abramson has shared some news of her plans to grow a start up with Steven Brill. Writers will be paid advances of around $100,000 to produce stories that will be longer than long magazine articles but shorter than books. There will be “one perfect whale of a story” each month and it will be available by subscription.
  4. Weave Magazine is seeking positive, self-motivated individuals to join its team of reviewers. Experience is preferred and reviewers can be based anywhere in the world.
  5. International Business Times has published an interesting article titled What Is Wattpad? The ‘YouTube For Stories’ Is Transforming Book Publishing. For writers wanting advice on using Wattpad, Rowena Wiseman has some fantastic tips.
  6. Australian writer and comedian Catherine Deveny has shared Ten Things No One Ever Tells You About Writing: “Remember, you’re not trying to kill anyone; you’re just trying to write some words, that turn into sentences that turn into stories. This platitude has helped too: ‘It doesn’t matter how slow you go, you’re lapping everyone on the couch’.”
  7. Tin House is accepting submissions for its non-themed Summer 2015 issue. It is looking for fiction, poetry, non-fiction and interviews. Submissions close 15 November. For more calls for submissions see our November and December Opportunities for Writers post.
  8. Writers have just over two weeks to get their entries in for the $20,000 Museum of Words Flash Fiction Contest. The entry process asks for a passport number which has understandably caused a few queries. Silvia from the Museum has explained that they require the passport number or another form of ID to make sure that everyone follows the rule of only one entry per person. The final entry deadline is Sunday 23 November.
  9. Amy Mason has won the Dundee International Book Prize. According to the BBC, the Bournemouth-born writer and performer Ms Mason left school at 16 and said she was a “disaster” throughout her 20s until she was “saved” by an evening writing class aged 25. Entries for the next Dundee Prize, which carries a £10,000 cash award plus publication, are expected to open in February.
  10. Are you looking for a way to write without distractions? If so, the Hemingwrite may be just the answer. This modern day twist on the typewriter helps people craft prose without the risk of being distracted by social media.hemingwrite details.jpg

For book news, writing competition updates, publication opportunities and more follow Aerogramme Writers’ Studio on Facebook and Twitter.

Boulevard Short Fiction Contest for Emerging Writers

Boulevard is accepting entries for its annual short fiction contest for emerging writers. The winner will receive US$1500 and have their story published in the magazine.

Boulevard is an American literary magazine established in 1985 and based at St. Louis University in Missouri. Boulevard aims to publish the finest in fiction, poetry and non-fiction and was described by Poet Laureate Daniel Hoffman as ‘one of the half-dozen best literary journals’. The magazine has been edited throughout its history by Richard Burgin, a five-time Pushcart Prize winner.

Boulevard’s Short Fiction Contest for Emerging Writers is open worldwide to people who have not yet published a book of fiction, poetry or creative non-fiction with a nationally distributed press. Stories may be up to 8000 words and must be previously unpublished.

The 2013 contest was won by Terrance Manning Jr for his story ‘Andretti in El Camino’. The story is available to be read in full here (PDF).

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Geoff Dyer's Top 10 Tips for Writers

Geoff Dyer was described in New York Magazine as being “one of our greatest living critics, not of the arts but of life itself, and one of our most original writers – always out there beyond literary Mach 1, breaking the how-things-usually-sound barrier.” He is the author of four novels, two essay collections, and six genre-defying titles (that generally find themselves shelved among the non-fiction). His most recent book, Another Great Day at Sea: Life Aboard the USS George H.W. Bush, was published in May of this year. In 2010 Dyer shared the following writing tips with the Guardian.

  1. Never worry about the commercial possibilities of a project. That stuff is for agents and editors to fret over—or not. Conversation with my American publisher. Me: “I’m writing a book so boring, of such limited commercial appeal, that if you publish it, it will probably cost you your job.” Publisher: “That’s exactly what makes me want to stay in my job.”
  2. Don’t write in public places. In the early 1990s I went to live in Paris. The usual writerly reasons: back then, if you were caught writing in a pub in England, you could get your head kicked in, whereas in Paris, dans les cafés … Since then I’ve developed an aversion to writing in public. I now think it should be done only in private, like any other lavatorial activity.
  3. Don’t be one of those writers who sentence themselves to a lifetime of sucking up to Nabokov.
  4. If you use a computer, constantly refine and expand your autocorrect settings. The only reason I stay loyal to my piece-of-shit computer is that I have invested so much ingenuity into building one of the great auto-correct files in literary history. Perfectly formed and spelt words emerge from a few brief keystrokes: “Niet” becomes “Nietzsche,” “phoy” becomes “photography” and so on. Genius!
  5. Keep a diary. The biggest regret of my writing life is that I have never kept a journal or a diary.
  6. Have regrets. They are fuel. On the page they flare into desire.
  7. Have more than one idea on the go at any one time. If it’s a choice between writing a book and doing nothing I will always choose the latter. It’s only if I have an idea for two books that I choose one rather than the other. I always have to feel that I’m bunking off from something.
  8. Beware of clichés. Not just the clichés that Martin Amis is at war with. There are clichés of response as well as expression. There are clichés of observation and of thought—even of conception. Many novels, even quite a few adequately written ones, are clichés of form which conform to clichés of expectation.
  9. Do it every day. Make a habit of putting your observations into words and gradually this will become instinct. This is the most important rule of all and, naturally, I don’t follow it.
  10. Never ride a bike with the brakes on. If something is proving too difficult, give up and do something else. Try to live without resort to per­severance. But writing is all about perseverance. You’ve got to stick at it. In my 30s I used to go to the gym even though I hated it. The purpose of going to the gym was to postpone the day when I would stop going. That’s what writing is to me: a way of postponing the day when I won’t do it any more, the day when I will sink into a depression so profound it will be indistinguishable from perfect bliss.

Read more writing tips from Hilary MantelPaulo Coelho, Teju ColeMeg Rosoff, Joss Whedon and Neil Gaiman.

Text via The Paris Review. Photo by Jason Oddy.

12 Literary Magazines for New & Unpublished Writers

Providing news and helpful information for emerging writers was one of the major motivations for starting the Aerogramme Writers’ Studio website. One of the most popular articles we’ve posted to date has been 9 Literary Magazines for New and Unpublished Writers. So, by popular demand, here are 12 more publication opportunities for writers at the start of their careers to consider.

If you haven’t submitted your work for publication before, or if you would just like some tips from the experts, be sure to read How to Submit Your Writing to Literary Magazines, a great article with lots of useful advice from the editors of Neon Literary Magazine.

1. Sixpenny
is a new digital magazine of illustrated short stories. Each issue has six stories that take six minutes to read: three by widely published authors, and three by unpublished authors. Each writer is paid $100 for their work. The editors are seeking literary fiction that ‘keeps a reader engaged and excited from the first word to the last.’

2. The Wrong Quarterly
is a London-based literary magazine showcasing prose from both British and international writers. Its aim is to provide an inclusive platform for emerging writers worldwide. The Wrong Quarterly accepts fiction up to 6000 words and non-fiction up to 5000 words.

3. Quiddit Literary Journal 
is part of a multimedia arts program produced by Benedictine University in partnership with NPR member station WUIS Illinois. The journal, published semi-annually, features prose, poetry and artwork. International submissions from emerging as well as established writers are encouraged.

4. Neon Literary Magazine
is published three times a year in print and online, and welcomes submissions from new and never before published writers. The magazine’s tastes tend towards the dark and the surreal. Writers are asked to include a short biography and cover letter with their submissions and poets should send several poems at once (rather than just one). Neon’s website also has a number of helpful links and resources for both emerging and established writers.
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