1. Library Card Tote Bag

Library Card Tote Bag

$19.99, available here


2. Books I Haven’t Read Book Ends

Books I Haven't Read Book Ends

$12.99, available here


3. Support Authors T-Shirt

Support Authors T-shirt

$27.50, available here


Continue Reading…

How a Cover Letter Can Help You Get Published

Canadian literary magazine PRISM international aims to publish the best contemporary fiction, creative non-fiction, translation, drama, and poetry from around the world. While its pages have featured such luminaries as Margaret Atwood, Jorge Luis Borges, Raymond Carver and Seamus Heaney, most of the work it publishes is unsolicited, and many writers whose first publication appeared in PRISM international have gone on to critical acclaim. PRISM’s Prose Editor Christopher Evans explains how your cover letter can play a role in you being published or not.

Writers often ask if a good cover letter can improve a piece’s chances of getting published, and the short answer is: sort of. Of the thousands of submissions PRISM receives in a year, a minuscule percentage – well under one percent – arrive flawlessly executed and ready to be published without any editorial effort on our end. A slightly larger percent of work submitted is very close, and needs only a few small edits to lift it to exceptional. There’s another ten to fifteen percent at the other end of the spectrum that never make it past our first readers – work that doesn’t even come close to our guidelines, is riddled with typos or unintentional tense shifts, or is basically porn. This leaves a substantial volume of submissions in the middle, and this is where a cover letter can help or hinder a piece’s chance of being given a second, third, or fourth read-through.

Continue Reading…

The 25th International Radio Playwriting Competition 2016

Writers from around the world are invited to enter the 25th International Radio Playwriting Competition. The competition is presented by the BBC World Service and the British Council, in partnership with Commonwealth Writers and co-produced by the Open University. Three winners will receive fully paid trips to London and there are two cash prizes of £2200 (US $3350).

To be eligible to enter the competition, writers must be over the age of 18 and be living outside the UK. Entries are encouraged from both new and established writers.

The competition has two first prizes – one for writers with English as a First Language and another for writers with English as a Second Language. Both winners will receive £2200, be flown to London to attend an award ceremony and see their plays recorded for broadcast on the BBC World Service.

Continue Reading…

A post by Maya Sapiurka, University of California, San Diego

One of the most interesting and entertaining parts of following my favourite authors on Twitter is witnessing a little bit of the writing process.

Getting a peek into how my favourite books are written is like watching a real-time behind-the-scenes DVD featurette. But not every update is a positive one. There’s something that haunts all writers, be they professional or amateur: writer’s block.

Writer’s block can be difficult to define, because no two people share the same experience of it. Probably the simplest and most straightforward definition comes from Dr. Patricia Huston:

a distinctly uncomfortable inability to write.

But what could be the cause of this vaguely described problem? Has a writer’s Muse simply deserted them, or can we find an explanation hidden somewhere in the brain?

The Location of Language

While there haven’t been any published scientific studies on people with writer’s block, we can take a few different avenues to try and determine what parts of the brain may be affected. One of those is looking at where words come from in the first place.

Continue Reading…

Penn State University Writing Residency

Pennsylvania State University‘s Altoona Campus English Program is taking applications for a one-semester teaching residency in poetry and playwriting/screenwriting. The program is targeted at early career writers, preferably without a published book.

The residency is designed to offer an emerging writer substantial time to write and offers a salary of $10,000 in return for teaching one general education level introduction to creative writing workshop during the Fall 2016 semester (22 August to 16 December).

The resident writer will also give a public reading, visit other creative writing courses and work informally with English major students. The hiring committee is looking for a writer with a history of publication in poetry and staged readings/performances (and/or publications) in playwriting or screenwriting. . The successful candidate typically lives in the Altoona area during the residency; benefits and housing are not included.

Continue Reading…

New Orleans Review is Accepting Work for a Special Shakespeare Issue

Literary magazine New Orleans Review is currently accepting work for a Shakespeare-inspired special issue. The issue will be published in 2016 to coincide with the 400th anniversary of the great writer’s death.

Submissions can “riff on, respond to, reimagine, or recast any of Shakespeare’s works”. The editors of New Orleans review are hoping to receive a wide variety of interpretations of the theme – from poetry to fiction, from radio plays to experimental texts.

Prose submissions can be up to 7500 words and poetry submissions should be no more than five pages. All work must be previously unpublished but simultaneous submissions are accepted. All contributors will receive two complimentary copies of the issue.

Continue Reading…

In Defense of Not Rereading - Photo by Lleven Van Melckebeke

Stuttgart Library by Lieven Van Melckebeke via Creative Commons
A guest post by Maggie Libby Davis

In a class a few semesters ago, our professor asked the timeless and, in my mind, answerless question: “What is your favorite book?” I don’t want to name a favorite. My favorite book today might change tomorrow, and what if I haven’t read my favorite book yet? It’s too much pressure. My professor pushed for an answer, offering at she thought was a lifeline with, “What book do you reread, over and over, just because you must, because your mind demands to hear the story again?”

Reread? Was she crazy? Who had time to reread when there were so many still to read the first time? Don’t misunderstand: I’ve read books multiple times. Dr. Seuss books, Judy Blume books, Lucy Maud Montgomery books. But in my adult reading career? No.

Continue Reading…