Amy Lowell Poetry Travelling Scholarship

Are you an American-born poet who would like to spend a year travelling abroad? If so, then the Amy Lowell Poetry Travelling Scholarship might just be your perfect opportunity.

The Amy Lowell Poetry Travelling Scholarship awards approximately US$54,000 annually to poet to spend one year outside North America, in whatever place the recipient feels will most advance his or her work. 

The scholarship is open to all American poets, whether there work has been published or not (though recent recipients have been published poets). There are no age restrictions and poets do not need to be enrolled at university or college. 

Applicants must complete an application form and there is also the option of providing a brief CV. Unpublished poets should provide a sample of their work of up to 40 typed pages. Published poets can supply one printed volume plus 20 typed pages of their most recent work. There is no entry fee.

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Books for Bloggers

Crown Publishing, a division Penguin Random House, has a new program to make it easier for online book reviewers to get their hands on the company’s latest releases. Blogging for Books allows reviewers to register and receive complimentary copies of Crown Publishing titles in exchange for their honest review. The site currently has over two million books in its collection.

The program is open to reviewers who have an active blog, as well as to librarians, booksellers and media outlets. To participate reviewers must first register on the site here. American reviewers are asked to provide their postal address so they can receive physical copies of the books, while reviewers based in other countries can only receive eBook editions.

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Amsterdam Writers' Residency - credit Maurizio Mori

Author John Green has described Amsterdam as the city he loves most in the world. It was an important setting for his bestseller The Fault in Our Stars and it was at the Amsterdam Writers’ Residency in 2011 that Green worked on many of the Dutch sections of his manuscript.

The Amsterdam Writers’ Residency was founded in 2006 and offers writers from around the world the opportunity to live and work in the literary heart of the city for up to three months.

About the Amsterdam Writers’ Residency
The Amsterdam Writers’ Residency was established by the Dutch Foundation for Literature (Nederlands Letterenfonds). Since it began over eight years ago it has provided a space for international writers to live and work in the city. Residents are provided with an apartment located above the Athenaeum Bookshop. The apartment has two bedrooms, a kitchen and living/working spaces. Residents are also provided with full access to University of Amsterdam Library. Writers usually stay for between two and three months, with the minimum stay being six weeks.

Residents are required to cover their own travel costs, though the program will actively work with writers to help locate other funding schemes to assist with such costs. A monthly service fee of 250 Euros is payable during the residency, though this may be covered by a monthly residence grant of up to 1500 Euros.

Writers in residence are expected to become involved in city’s literary and cultural life. This may include giving guest lectures and readings, or participating in media events. Many of the guest writers visit Amsterdam not only to write or to do research, but also to promote the translation of one of their books or to attend a literary festival. Continue Reading…

Truman Capote Reads From Breakfast At Tiffanys

Very few authors, especially the unpublished, can resist an invitation to read aloud. I made us both a drink and, settling in a chair opposite, began to read to her, my voice a little shaky with a combination of stage fright and enthusiasm: it was a new story, I’d finished it the day before, and that inevitable sense of shortcoming had not had time to develop.
– Truman Capote, Breakfast at Tiffany’s: A Short Novel and Three Stories

This reading from Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote was recorded in New York City at the 92nd Street Y on 7 April 1963. Before the reading, the Y’s Poetry Center Director John Malcolm Brinnin introduced the author saying:

In the very curious sociology of these times, the name of Truman Capote has become a household word . . . He no longer has to write a book to make news, but simply to be Truman Capote. No one is surprised anymore to learn that this young American writer has been quietly dining with Princess Margaret, or that he has been spirited off on the yachts of Greeks richer than Mycenaes, or that he has recently flown to Amsterdam to have a tooth filled.

But let us be wary of the disguises of genius. Anyone who knows Truman Capote knows that the columnists capture the details but miss the point. Beyond the public image of Truman Capote there stands a very private man, who owns one of the toughest, most resourceful and surgically adept minds in modern letters. And if we now must note that the boy wonder has become the prodigal son, that is all the more reason why I am happy to invite you to join me in welcoming him.

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Twenty Rules for Writing Detective Stories - Buster Keaton Title Image
By S.S. Van Dine, a pseudonym for art critic and detective novelist Willard Huntington Wright. First published in The American Magazine in September 1928. 

The detective story is a kind of intellectual game. It is more — it is a sporting event. And for the writing of detective stories there are very definite laws — unwritten, perhaps, but none the less binding; and every respectable and self-respecting concocter of literary mysteries lives up to them. Herewith, then, is a sort Credo, based partly on the practice of all the great writers of detective stories, and partly on the promptings of the honest author’s inner conscience. To wit:

 1. The reader must have equal opportunity with the detective for solving the mystery. All clues must be plainly stated and described.

2. No willful tricks or deceptions may be placed on the reader other than those played legitimately by the criminal on the detective himself.

3. There must be no love interest. The business in hand is to bring a criminal to the bar of justice, not to bring a lovelorn couple to the hymeneal altar.

4. The detective himself, or one of the official investigators, should never turn out to be the culprit. This is bald trickery, on a par with offering some one a bright penny for a five-dollar gold piece. It’s false pretenses.

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In the afterword of Stephen King’s highly regarded memoir/writing guide book On Writing, the bestselling writer shared a list of 96 books that he’d read while writing the book that he’d enjoyed and had influenced him. When a 10th anniversary of On Writing was released, an updated reading list of 82 books was included.

More recently, King has taken to Twitter to share with his fans and followers some of his favourite recent reads. Since joining the social media site in December 2013, he’s recommended the following 22 books.

1. Red Moon by Benjamin Percy

Stephen King Reading List - Red Moon by Benjamin Percy

   

 2. The Marauders by Tom Cooper

Stephen King Reading List - The Marauders by Tom Cooper

 

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Opportunities for Writers August and September 2014

Over 90 competitions, publication opportunities, fellowships and more.

Please check the relevant websites for all terms and conditions and be aware that entry fees are payable in many instances.

Prairie Schooner
was established in 1926. Its intention is to publish the best writing available, both from beginning and established writers. Entries are now open for its Summer Creative Nonfiction Essay Contest. Closes 1 August.

Can Serrat Residency 
near Barcelona offers two writers full stipends for 30 days (including accommodation and most meals). The residency is open to all writers regardless of nationality or age. Applications close 1 August.

Costa Short Story Award
is run as part of the Costa Book Awards, one of the UK’s most prestigious and popular literary prizes. The award is for a single, previously unpublished short story of up to 4000 words.The winner receives £3500. Entries close 1 August.

Cold Mountain Review 
publishes poetry, creative non-fiction, interviews with creative writers, fiction and art. Submissions are read between August and May each year.

Gival Press Short Story Award
is now in its 11th year. Stories between 5000 and 15,0000 are eligible for entry and the winner receives US$1000 and publication. Entries close 8 August.

Writing Maps
runs a monthly writing contest to coincide with the launch of a new Writing Map. It challenges writers to submit a 150-word response to its prompt of the month. Each month’s two winning entries will be published in A3, the new Writing Maps journal, a fold-out literary magazine to be published every six months.

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