12 Literary Magazines for New & Unpublished Writers

Providing news and helpful information for emerging writers was one of the major motivations for starting the Aerogramme Writers’ Studio website. One of the most popular articles we’ve posted to date has been 9 Literary Magazines for New and Unpublished Writers. So, by popular demand, here are 12 more publication opportunities for writers at the start of their careers to consider.

If you haven’t submitted your work for publication before, or if you would just like some tips from the experts, be sure to read How to Submit Your Writing to Literary Magazines, a great article with lots of useful advice from the editors of Neon Literary Magazine.

1. Sixpenny
is a new digital magazine of illustrated short stories. Each issue has six stories that take six minutes to read: three by widely published authors, and three by unpublished authors. Each writer is paid $100 for their work. The editors are seeking literary fiction that ‘keeps a reader engaged and excited from the first word to the last.’

2. The Wrong Quarterly
is a London-based literary magazine showcasing prose from both British and international writers. Its aim is to provide an inclusive platform for emerging writers worldwide. The Wrong Quarterly accepts fiction up to 6000 words and non-fiction up to 5000 words.

3. Quiddit Literary Journal 
is part of a multimedia arts program produced by Benedictine University in partnership with NPR member station WUIS Illinois. The journal, published semi-annually, features prose, poetry and artwork. International submissions from emerging as well as established writers are encouraged.

4. Neon Literary Magazine
is published three times a year in print and online, and welcomes submissions from new and never before published writers. The magazine’s tastes tend towards the dark and the surreal. Writers are asked to include a short biography and cover letter with their submissions and poets should send several poems at once (rather than just one). Neon’s website also has a number of helpful links and resources for both emerging and established writers.
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Penn State University Writing Residency

Pennsylvania State University‘s Altoona Campus English Program is taking applications for a one-semester teaching residency in fiction and creative nonfiction. The program is targeted at early career writers, preferably without a published book.

The residency is designed to offer an emerging writer substantial time to write and offers a salary of $10,000 in return for teaching one general education level introduction to creative writing workshop during the Fall 2015 semester (24 August to 18 December).

The resident writer will also give a public reading, visit other creative writing courses and work informally with English major students. The hiring committee is looking for a writer with publications of fiction and creative nonfiction in literary magazines. The successful candidate typically lives in the Altoona area during the residency; benefits and housing are not included.

A Master’s degree in Creative Writing or English is required; an MFA or PhD in Creative Writing is preferred. Teaching experience is also preferred. Review of applications will begin on 1 April 1 2015 and will continue until the position is filled.

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“Every story, every incident, every bit of conversation is raw material for me.” 
– Sylvia Plath, The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath

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Friday Aerogramme 24 October 2014

Friday 24 October 2014

  1. Momentum Books seeking to hire a book blogger. The blogger will write between 4 and 8 posts per month on topics related to reading, writing, books and storytelling culture (paid position).
  2. Helen Garner’s Monkey Grip, an extraordinary documentary that uncovers the real events behind Garner’s groundbreaking debut novel, is available to stream on ABC iView until next Thursday (geoblocked, Australia only).
  3. The New Yorker has published a new short story by Oscar-winning actor Tom Hanks. Listen to Hanks read ‘Alan Bean Plus Four’ on Soundcloud.
  4. The Wrong Quarterly is a new London-based literary magazine showcasing prose from British and international writers. It is accepting submissions of fiction, non-fiction, life-writing and essays. The Wrong Quarterly is also seeking experienced readers and copyeditors.
  5. Small Press Network has announced the shortlist for the Most Underrated Book Award 2014. The award aims to shine a light on some of the outstanding titles that are released by small and independent Australian publishers that, for whatever reason, did not receive their fair dues when first released.
  6. The Ministry of Stories, a creative writing and mentoring centre for young people in east London, is advertising a number of positions including Creative Learning Manager and Community Engagement Coordinator.
  7. Vogue has posted an exclusive preview of a new documentary about the life on Joan Didion. The film is being made by her nephew, Griffin Dunne, the longtime actor and filmmaker, together with the documentarian Susanne Rostock.
  8. Entries for the Horatio Nelson Fiction Prize for Unpublished Manuscripts close next Friday. The winner will receive $5000 and publication through Black Balloon.
  9. Have you ever dreamed of being locked in a bookshop at night? If you have, check out this competition Waterstones and AirBnB are running in London.
  10. After a few months break, Aerogramme Writers’ Studio is back on Tumblr. Say hello at aerogrammestudio.tumblr.com.

For book news, writing competition updates, publication opportunities and more follow Aerogramme Writers’ Studio on Facebook and Twitter.

Title image by Ron Reiring via Creative Commons

Granta is Accepting Unsolicited Submissions

After a long hiatus Granta, one of the world’s most prestigious literary magazines, is again accepting unsolicited submissions.

Granta’s history can be traced back to 1889 when a student politics and literature magazine called The Granta was founded at Cambridge University. Since its relaunch 35 years ago, Granta has been a quarterly literary journal, with the aim of publishing the best new writing.

Granta publishes fiction, non-fiction and poetry. There are no strict word limits, though most prose submissions are between 3000 and 6000 words and the editors advise they are unlikely to read more than 10,000 words of any submission.

Alongside the print edition, the online New Writing program publishes stories, poems, essays, interviews, animations and more from established Granta alumni as well as new voices.

All submissions will be considered for both the print and online editions (unless otherwise stipulated in the cover letter). Selection is extremely competitive and only a very small fraction of submissions will be chosen for publication. Reading recent editions of Granta will help you assess whether your work is likely to be a good match.

Writers must submit their work via Submittable and there are no reading fees. For further information visit the Granta website. Submissions are scheduled to remain open until 1 April 2015.

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Reading all 4,197 pages of the first five books in George R.R. Martin’s Game of Thrones A Song of Ice and Fire series would take the average reader 424 days. With this test from blinkboxbooks.com, readers can now calculate how long it would long take them to complete this reading challenge, and how much time they would need to set aside to finish other bestsellers including the entire Harry Potter series, Donna Tartt’s Putlizer-Prize winning The Goldfinch and Haruki Murakami’s 1Q84.

Take the Test

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“Maybe nobody’s perfect but Billy Wilder comes as close to it as you’ll find among filmmakers in Hollywood today, and also yesterday.” – Jack Lemmon

Six-time Oscar winner Billy Wilder is one of the most respected and beloved screenwriters and directors of the twentieth century. In 1999’s Conversations with Wilder by fellow filmmaker Cameron Crowe (Jerry Maguire, Elizabethtown), Wilder discussed his extraordinary career in detail and shared the following tips for writers:

  1. The audience is fickle.
  2. Grab ‘em by the throat and never let ‘em go.
  3. Develop a clean line of action for your leading character.
  4. Know where you’re going.
  5. The more subtle and elegant you are in hiding your plot points, the better you are as a writer.
  6. If you have a problem with the third act, the real problem is in the first act.
  7. A tip from [Ernst] Lubitsch: Let the audience add up two plus two. They’ll love you forever.
  8. In doing voice-overs, be careful not to describe what the audience already sees. Add to what they are seeing.
  9. The event that occurs at the second-act curtain triggers the end of the movie.
  10. The third act must build, build, build in tempo and action until the last event, and then –
  11. – that’s it. Don’t hang around.

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