first-person-plural

A guest post by Sadye Teiser, Editorial Director of The Masters Review

When it is done right, a story told in the first-person plural can hold incredible power. In this craft essay, we take a look at successful uses of this point of view and some of its common pitfalls.

“If the first-person plural tries to be too sweeping, if it does not acknowledge its own subtleties, it can miss the mark.”

Here at The Masters Review, we often see trends among submissions. During any given reading period, patterns emerge: sometimes, there are a remarkable number of stories with surreal elements; lately, we’ve been seeing a lot of pieces about drones; for one anthology, we received an uncanny number of stories that involved fish hooks. One of the most interesting trends to identify, however, is the popularity of specific points of view. For a while, we received an enormous amount of stories told in the second person (and we still get a bunch of these). But what we have been noticing a lot of lately (and loving) is fiction told in the first-person plural. Authors are embracing the collective voice—“us” and “we”—to tell tales about group experience.

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Literary magazine Kenyon Review is inviting applications for a two-year post-graduate residential fellowship at Kenyon College, located in Gambier, Ohio. The fellowship aims to provide qualified individuals with time to develop as writers, teachers, and editors. The fellowship provides an annual US$35,150 stipend, plus health benefits.

The fellowship program commenced In 2012. It was as inspired by the great tradition of Kenyon Review literary fellowships awarded in the 1950s to writers such as Flannery O’Connor and W.S. Merwin in their formative years.

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Are you an American-born poet who would like to spend a year travelling abroad? If so, then the Amy Lowell Poetry Travelling Scholarship might just be your perfect opportunity.

The Amy Lowell Poetry Travelling Scholarship awards approximately US$58,000 annually to a poet to spend one year outside North America, in whatever place the recipient feels will most advance his or her work.

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Cover art from “Annie Muktuk and Other Stories,” Norma Dunning’s first book filled with sixteen Inuit stories which portray the unvarnished realities of northern life via strong and gritty characters.
(University of Alberta Press)

A post by Norma Dunning, University of Alberta

I am Norma Dunning. I am a beneficiary of Nunavut; my ancestral ties lie in the village of Whale Cove. I have never been there. My folks left the North shortly before my birth. I am southern Inuk, born and raised.

I am a writer. I have always been a writer. I would dream of publishing my writing, but it was easier and safer not to. I kept all of it in a drawer. I would think about publishing, and then I would think about the process of publishing. As an Indigenous, female writer I didn’t want to take it. I didn’t want to take the criticism.

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Sustainable Arts Foundation Grants for Writers and Artists with Families 2016

The Sustainable Arts Foundation is offering $5000 awards to writers and artists with children. The money can be used for costs such as child care, workspaces, new equipment, research and travel.

The Sustainable Arts Foundation was founded in 2010 with the aim of encouraging parents to continue pursuing their creative passion, and to rekindle it in those who may have let it slide.

In 2017 the foundation has increased its funding and will make its $5000 awards to twenty artists and writers. The awards are offered as unrestricted cash, and recipients can use the funds as they see fit.

To be eligible to apply for a grant you must have at least one child under the age of 18.  Applicants can be based anywhere in the world and there are no citizenship restrictions.

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Boston Review is now accepting entries for the 2018 Aura Estrada Short Story Contest.

Founded in 1975, Boston Review is one of America’s most prestigious literature and politics magazines. Past contributors include Saul Bellow, Jhumpa Lahiri and John Updike.

Boston Review’s Aura Estrada Short Story Contest is open to all writers, regardless of citizenship or publication history. The winner of the contest will receive $1500 and have his or her work published on the Boston Review website. The runners-up stories may also be published.

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A guest post by Rachele Salvini

The first time I watched my own fiction writing coming out of a printer, I could not believe it. The printer belonged to the library of a well-known liberal arts college in New York, and it was weird for me to even be there. I was an Italian girl alone in the United States, and I was about to show that same writing to a bunch of students who would then give me feedback. All this, of course, would take place in English.

Maybe this does not sound like a big deal. That is how every creative writing workshop works and, in the end, the feedback I got was not bad at all. I can remember the story I read and most of what was said by my classmates. I went home happy, but my initial worries were absolutely legitimate. I had been reading books in English for a long time and I was pursuing a degree in English language and literature, but I had always written in Italian. Writing in another language was a completely new challenge.

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